Books

Page 9 of 20, showing 12 records out of 237 total, starting on record 97, ending on 108

Mountain Kings: Agony and Euphoria on the Peaks of the Tour De France (by Giles Belbin)

Punk Publishing Ltd (15 May, 2013)

The Tour de France is one of the world's most renowned and best-loved sporting events, and its challenging climbs are the stuff of pure legend. In Mountain Kings, author and cycling journalist Giles Belbin gets up close and personal to the Tour's most iconic peaks and the indomitable heroes who've powered their way up them. Belbin has selected and cycled 25 of these classic mountain climbs to give a compell ...

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Mrs Robinson's Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady (by Kate Summerscale)

Bloomsbury Paperbacks (14 Mar, 2013)

When the married Isabella Robinson was introduced to the dashing Edward Lane at a party in 1850, she was utterly enchanted. He was ‘fascinating’, she told her diary, before chastising herself for being so susceptible to a man’s charms. But a wish had taken hold of her, and she was to find it hard to shake... In one of the most notorious divorce cases of the nineteenth century, Isabella Robinson ...

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Last Curtsey: The End of the Debutantes (by Fiona MacCarthy)

Faber and Faber (05 Oct, 2006)

In 1958 - the year in which Krushchev came to power in Russia, the year after Eden's resignation over Suez, two years after John Osborne's Look Back in Anger - the last of the debutantes, myself among them, went to the Palace to curtsey to the Queen. MacCarthy and her fellow 'debs', or 'gels' were taking part in a remarkable remnant of the rituals of aristocratic power. The system had been in operati ...

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When I Heard the Bell: The Loss of the Iolaire (by John Macleod)

Birlinn Ltd (03 May, 2010)

On 31 December 1918, hours from the first New Year of peace, hundreds of Royal Naval Reservists from the Isle of Lewis poured off successive trains onto the quayside at Kyle of Lochalsh. A chaotic Admiralty had made no adequate arrangements for their safe journey home. Corners were cut, an elderly and recently requisitioned steam-yacht was sent from Stornoway, and that evening HMY Iolaire sailed from Kyle o ...

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The Death of Marco Pantani: A Biography (by Matt Rendell)

Phoenix (06 Jun, 2007)

At 9:30 pm on 14 February 2004, former Tour de France winner Marco Pantani was found dead in Rimini. It emerged that he had been addicted to cocaine since Autumn 1999, weeks after being expelled from the Tour of Italy for blood doping. Conspiracy theories abounded - that he was injected in his sleep by a business rival, that the Olympic Committee had framed him, that Italian Industrialists had engineere ...

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The Sword and the Cross: The Conquest of the Sahara (by Fergus Fleming)

Granta Books (27 Mar, 2003)

At the end of the 19th century, who would want to conquer the Sahara, a vast and hellish desert? France did, and this is the story of the two fanatical adventurers who made it possible. It is a dark and strange tale of survival in a harsh environment, extreme religious zeal, imperial dreams and violent death. This is a vivid, haunting and sharply witty history of a forgotten episode in Europe's colonial cru ...

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Pompeii: The Life of a Roman Town (by Mary Beard)

Profile Books (16 Jul, 2009)

The ruins of Pompeii, buried by an explosion of Vesuvius in 79 CE, offer the best evidence we have of everyday life in the Roman empire. This remarkable book rises to the challenge of making engrossing sense of those remains. What kind of town was it? What can it actually tell us about life then - from sex to politics, food to religion, slavery to literacy?A number of myths have to be exploded - the very da ...

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Giants: The Dwarfs of Auschwitz: The Extraordinary Story of the Lilliput Troupe (by Yehuda Koren, Eilat Negev)

The Robson Press (12 Feb, 2013)

Giants: The Dwarfs of Auschwitz is a moving and inspirational story of survival, of a troupe of seven dwarf siblings, whose story starts like a fairy tale, before moving into the darkest moments of their history; the darkest moments of modern history. At a time when the phrase survival of the fittest was paramount, the Ovitz family, seven of whose ten members were dwarfs, less than three feet tall, defied t ...

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1888 London Murders in the Year of the Ripper (by Peter Stubley)

The History Press Ltd (01 Sep, 2012)

In 1888 Jack the Ripper made the headlines with a series of horrific murders that remain unsolved to this day. But most killers are not shadowy figures stalking the streets with a lust for blood. Many are ordinary citizens driven to the ultimate crime by circumstance, a fit of anger or a desire for revenge. Their crimes, overshadowed by the few, sensational cases, are ignored, forgotten or written off. This ...

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Stanley: The Impossible Life of Africa's Greatest Explorer (by Tim Jeal)

Faber and Faber (06 Mar, 2008)

The tragic life of the most brilliant adventurer in the great age of exploration. Henry Morton Stanley was a cruel imperialist - a bad man of Africa - who connived with King Leopold II of Belgium in horrific crimes against the people of the Congo. He also conducted the most legendary celebrity interview in history, remembered in the words `Dr Livingstone, I presume?' Or so we think: but as Tim Jea ...

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Father and Son (Oxford World's Classics) (by Edmund Gosse)

OUP Oxford (26 Mar, 2009)

'This book is the record of a struggle between two temperaments, two consciences and almost two epochs.' Father and Son stands as one of English literature's seminal autobiographies. In it Edmund Gosse recounts, with humour and pathos, his childhood as a member of a Victorian Protestant sect and his struggles to forge his own identity despite the loving control of his father. A key document of the crisis of ...

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Forgotten Footprints: Lost stories in the discovery of Antarctica (by John Harrison)

Parthian Books (01 May, 2012)

Forgotten Footprints tells the story of the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands and the Weddell Sea: the most visited places in Antarctica. In 12 years John Harrison has visited the Antarctic over 40 times, where he works as a guide and lectures on adventure cruise ships. Here he offers a selection of highly readable anecdotal accounts of the merchantmen, navy men, sealers, whalers, and aviators who ...

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