Books

Page 8 of 13, showing 12 records out of 147 total, starting on record 85, ending on 96

The Philosophy of a Mad Man (by Steven Colborne)

SilverWood Books (17 Jun, 2012)

Steven Colborne was born in 1982 in Cambridge, England. He grew up in Abingdon near Oxford and moved to London to study in 2000. He is a graduate of the University of Westminster, and has undertaken postgraduate studies at the University of London. Steven's career began in the music industry, but more recently he has worked for a number of national charities. He currently lives in South London, not far from ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Final Curtsey (by Margaret Rhodes)

Umbria Press (30 Nov, -0001)

This is the intimate and revealing autobiography of Margaret Rhodes, the first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II and the niece of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother. Margaret was born into the Scottish aristocracy, into a now almost vanished world of privilege. Royalty often came to stay and her house was run in the style of Downton Abbey. In the Second World War years she 'lodged' at Buckingham Palace while she ...

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2.0 Stars2.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Charles Dickens: A Life (by Claire Tomalin)

Viking (06 Oct, 2011)

Charles Dickens was a phenomenon: a demonicly hardworking journalist, the father of ten children, a tireless walker and traveller, a supporter of liberal social causes, but most of all a great novelist - the creator of characters who live immortally in the English imagination: the Artful Dodger, Mr Pickwick, Pip, David Copperfield, Little Nell, Lady Dedlock, and many more. At the age of twelve he was sen ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Zeitoun (by Dave Eggers)

Penguin (24 Feb, 2011)

A true story of one man's courage when confronted with an awesome force of nature followed by more troubling human oppression.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Daphne Du Maurier: A Daughter's Memoir (by Flavia Leng)

Mainstream Publishing (16 Apr, 1995)

In this memoir the author paints a portrait of her mother, Daphne du Maurier. She presents an account of an unusual and often lonely childhood spent in London and in Cornwall at her mother's beloved house, Menabilly. Family friends included Gertrude Lawrence and Noel Coward, and Nelson and Ellen Doubleday. However at the centre of this story is Daphne du Maurier herself. This book reveals a writer who had a ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Monsoon Diary: Reveries and Recipes from South India (by Shoba Narayan)

Bantam Books (Transworld Publishers a division of the Random House Group) (02 Aug, 2004)

MONSOON DIARY weaves a fascinating food narrative that combines authentic vegetarian recipes from South India with tales from Shoba Narayan's life, stories of her delightfully eccentric family, and reflections on Indian culture. Shoba recounts her childhood in South India, a portrait of small-town life richly populated by characters like the flower woman who brings jasmine for the gods, the milkman who name ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Hare With Amber Eyes: A Hidden Inheritance (by Edmund de Waal)

Vintage (27 Jan, 2011)

The history of a family through 264 objects - set against a turbulent century - from an acclaimed writer and potter.

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2.0 Stars2.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Carpet Ride to Khiva: Seven Years on the Silk Road (by Christopher Aslan Alexander)

Icon Books Ltd (01 Jul, 2010)

This is a unique, beautiful and moving account of seven years living in the remote Uzbek desert. "The Silk Road" conjures images of the exotic and the unknown. Most travellers simply pass along it. Brit Chris Alexander chose to live there. Ostensibly writing a guidebook, Alexander found life at the heart of the glittering madrassahs, mosques and minarets of the walled city of Khiva - a remote desert oasis i ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Call The Midwife: A True Story Of The East End In The 1950s (by Jennifer Worth)

Phoenix (05 Jan, 2012)

Jennifer Worth came from a sheltered background when she became a midwife in the Docklands in the 1950s. The conditions in which many women gave birth just half a century ago were horrifying, not only because of their grimly impoverished surroundings, but also because of what they were expected to endure. But while Jennifer witnessed brutality and tragedy, she also met with amazing kindness and understandin ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 3 Reviews

 
 

May I Have Your Attention Please? (by James Corden)

Century (29 Sep, 2011)

As far back as he can remember James Corden has only ever wanted to be in one place: in front of you, doing something to make you cry, shout, scream or giggle uncontrollably; whether it's entertaining the congregation at his baby sister's christening at the age of four, clowning around in class, or snogging Sue Barker in front of thousands of people at Sports Relief. But it wasn't that easy getting the ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? (by Jeanette Winterson)

Jonathan Cape (27 Oct, 2011)

The shocking, heart-breaking - and often very funny - true story behind Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit.

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Over Hill and Dale (by Gervase Phinn)

Penguin (24 Sep, 2009)

Gervase Phinn begins his second year as a schools inspector in Yorkshire. Gervase's colleagues rag him unmercifully about his faraway look whenever the name of Christine Bentley of WinneryNook Nursery and Primary School is mentioned, and he realises it is time to take action - but how to put the question?

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
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