Books

Page 7 of 20, showing 12 records out of 237 total, starting on record 73, ending on 84

The Worst Street in London: Foreword by Peter Ackroyd (by Fiona Rule)

Ian Allan (10 Oct, 2011)

Halfway up Commercial Street, one block away from Spitalfields Market, lies an anonymous service road. The average pedestrian wouldn't even notice it existed. But unlikely though it may seem, this characterless, 400ft strip of tarmac was once Dorset Street - the most notorious thoroughfare in the Capital; the worst street in London and the resort of Protestant fire-brands, thieves, con-men, pimps, prostitut ...

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The Victorian House: Domestic Life from Childbirth to Deathbed (by Judith Flanders)

Harper Perennial (02 Aug, 2004)

The Victorian age is both recent and unimaginably distant. In the most prosperous and technologically advanced nation in the world, people carried slops up and down stairs; buried meat in fresh earth to prevent mould forming; wrung sheets out in boiling water with their bare hands. This drudgery was routinely performed by the parents of people still living, but the knowledge of it has passed as if it had ne ...

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A Field Guide to Happiness: What I Learned in Bhutan about Living, Loving, and Waking Up (by Linda Leaming)

Hay House (01 Oct, 2014)

In the West, we have everything we could possibly need or want—except for peace of mind. So writes Linda Leaming, a harried American who traveled from Nashville, Tennessee, to the rugged Himalayan nation of Bhutan—sometimes called the happiest place on Earth—to teach English and unlearn her politicized and polarized, energetic and impatient way of life. In Bhutan if I have three things to do in ...

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A Very British Murder (by Lucy Worsley)

BBC Digital (12 Sep, 2013)

This is the story of a national obsession. Ever since the Ratcliffe Highway Murders caused a nation-wide panic in Regency England, the British have taken an almost ghoulish pleasure in 'a good murder'. This fascination helped create a whole new world of entertainment, inspiring novels, plays and films, puppet shows, paintings and true-crime journalism - as well as an army of fictional detectives who ...

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The Woman Who Would Be King (by Kara Cooney)

Crown (14 Oct, 2014)

Hatshepsut—the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty—was born into a privileged position in the royal household, and she was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father’s family. Her failure to produce a male heir was ultimately the twist of fate that paved the way for her improbable rule as a cross-dressing king. At ...

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While the Gods Were Sleeping: A Journey Through Love and Rebellion in Nepal (by Elizabeth Enslin)

Seal Press (16 Oct, 2014)

Love and marriage brought American anthropologist Elizabeth Enslin to a world she never planned to make her own: a life among Brahman in-laws in a remote village in the plains of Nepal. As she faced the challenges of married life, birth, and childrearing in a foreign culture, she discovered as much about human resilience, and the capacity for courage, as she did about herself. While the Gods Were Sleeping: ...

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The Mango Orchard: The extraordinary true story of a family lost and found (by Robin Bayley)

Arrow (07 Apr, 2011)

As a child, Robin Bayley was enchanted by his grandmother's stories of Mexican adventures: of bandits, wild jungle journeys, hidden bags of silver and a narrow escape from the bloody Mexican Revolution. But Robin sensed there was more to these stories than anyone knew, and so he set out to follow in the footsteps of his great-grandfather. The Mango Orchard is the story of parallel journeys, a hundred yea ...

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Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal (by Mary Roach)

Oneworld Publications (06 Mar, 2014)

In this international bestseller, Mary Roach breaks bread with spit connoisseurs, beer and pet-food tasters, stomach slugs, potato crisp engineers, enema exorcists, rectum-examining prison guards, competitive hot dog eaters, Elvis' doctor, and many more as she investigates the beginning, and the end, of our food.

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You are Not So Smart: Why Your Memory is Mostly Fiction, Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook a (by David McRaney)

Oneworld Publications (04 Oct, 2012)

How many of your Facebook friends do you think you know? Would you help a stranger in need? Do you know why you’re so in love with your new smartphone? The truth is: you’re probably wrong. You are not so smart. In this international bestseller, award-winning journalist David McRaney examines the assorted ways we mislead ourselves every single day. A psychology course with all the boring bits tak ...

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My Secret Life in Hut Six: One Woman's Experiences At Bletchley Park (by Mair Russell-Jones)

Lion Books (18 Jul, 2014)

The story of the World War 2 de-coders of Bletchley Park continues to fascinate many. How did Mair Thomas, brought up in the Welsh valleys and a musician, find herself in the rarefied atmosphere of Hut Six, surrounded by hundreds of others, all desperately trying to break the German Enigma Code? How did she cope? What was it like? Sworn to secrecy and working in cramped and uncomfortable conditions, Mair di ...

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The King Of The Crime Writers: The Biography of John Creasey (by Nigel Cawthorne)

PIQWIQ (13 May, 2014)

FFiction maestro John Creasey (1908 - 1973) was and remains an enigma. He was one of the biggest selling and most prolific crime writers of the 20th century. Creasey wrote over 620 novels in both his own name and through over 25 different pseudonyms including; Norman Deane, Michael Halliday, Jeremy York, Gordon Ashe, JJ Maric and Anthony Morton. Creasey's popularity is as staggering as his output with bo ...

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Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage to the Antarctic (by Alfred Lansing)

Phoenix (04 May, 2000)

In the summer of 1914, Sir Ernest Shackleton set off aboard the Endur ance bound for the South Atlantic. The goal of his expedition was to cross t he Antarctic overland, but more than a year later, and still half a continent aw ay from the intended base, the Endurance was trapped in ice and eventuall y was crushed. For five months Shackleton and his crew survived on drifting ice packs in one of the most sav ...

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