Books

Page 5 of 8, showing 12 records out of 91 total, starting on record 49, ending on 60

Len Goodmans Lost London (by Len Goodman)

Trinity Mirror Media (02 Sep, 2013)

I was almost born within the sound of Bow Bells, nearly born in Wales, but ended up being born in Kent. But never mind all that, I'm a Londoner, through and through. I spent my early childhood in Bethnal Green and even when we moved to live across the other side of the Thames I spent as much time as I could in the East End. I worked on the docks in London, played football all over London and once I took up ...

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St. Peter's Bones: How the Relics of the First Pope Were Lost and Found . . . and Then Lost and Foun (by Thomas J. Craughwell)

Image (14 Jan, 2014)

In this fascinating account of the search for the remains of the world's first pope, none other than Peter, the chief apostle of Jesus, Thomas J. Craughwell takes us on one of the most exciting archaeological finds of the twentieth century. In 1448 a team of architects and engineers brought Pope Nicholas V unhappy news: the 1,100-year-old Basilica of St. Peter suffered from so many structural defects ...

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Elizabeth of York (by Alison Weir)

Jonathan Cape (07 Nov, 2013)

Elizabeth of York would have ruled England, but for the fact that she was a woman. The eldest daughter of Edward IV, at seventeen she was relegated from pampered princess to bastard fugitive, but the probable murders of her brothers, the Princes in the Tower, left Elizabeth heiress to the royal House of York, and in 1486, Henry VII, first sovereign of the House of Tudor, married her, thus uniting the re ...

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The Shadows of Elisa Lynch: How a Nineteenth-century Irish Courtesan Became the Most Powerful Woman (by Sian Rees)

Headline Review (05 Jan, 2004)

In 1854, an ambitious Irish courtesan met a South American General in Paris and returned with him to Paraguay. When he became President, she became his de facto first lady and together they changed the course of the country's history. Consumed by desire for Napoleonic glory, General President López took Paraguay into a disastrous war against her neighbours. Elisa Lynch went with him on campaign, turning co ...

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The Assassination of the Archduke: Sarajevo 1914 and the Murder that Changed the World (by Greg King, Sue Woolmans)

Macmillan (26 Sep, 2013)

The tragic story behind 'the shot that rang round the world' - the assassination of Franz Ferdinand and his beloved wife in Sarajevo in June 1914

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Mrs Robinson's Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady (by Kate Summerscale)

Bloomsbury Paperbacks (14 Mar, 2013)

When the married Isabella Robinson was introduced to the dashing Edward Lane at a party in 1850, she was utterly enchanted. He was ‘fascinating’, she told her diary, before chastising herself for being so susceptible to a man’s charms. But a wish had taken hold of her, and she was to find it hard to shake... In one of the most notorious divorce cases of the nineteenth century, Isabella Robinson ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Last Curtsey: The End of the Debutantes (by Fiona MacCarthy)

Faber and Faber (05 Oct, 2006)

In 1958 - the year in which Krushchev came to power in Russia, the year after Eden's resignation over Suez, two years after John Osborne's Look Back in Anger - the last of the debutantes, myself among them, went to the Palace to curtsey to the Queen. MacCarthy and her fellow 'debs', or 'gels' were taking part in a remarkable remnant of the rituals of aristocratic power. The system had been in operati ...

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When I Heard the Bell: The Loss of the Iolaire (by John Macleod)

Birlinn Ltd (03 May, 2010)

On 31 December 1918, hours from the first New Year of peace, hundreds of Royal Naval Reservists from the Isle of Lewis poured off successive trains onto the quayside at Kyle of Lochalsh. A chaotic Admiralty had made no adequate arrangements for their safe journey home. Corners were cut, an elderly and recently requisitioned steam-yacht was sent from Stornoway, and that evening HMY Iolaire sailed from Kyle o ...

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The Sword and the Cross: The Conquest of the Sahara (by Fergus Fleming)

Granta Books (27 Mar, 2003)

At the end of the 19th century, who would want to conquer the Sahara, a vast and hellish desert? France did, and this is the story of the two fanatical adventurers who made it possible. It is a dark and strange tale of survival in a harsh environment, extreme religious zeal, imperial dreams and violent death. This is a vivid, haunting and sharply witty history of a forgotten episode in Europe's colonial cru ...

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Pompeii: The Life of a Roman Town (by Mary Beard)

Profile Books (16 Jul, 2009)

The ruins of Pompeii, buried by an explosion of Vesuvius in 79 CE, offer the best evidence we have of everyday life in the Roman empire. This remarkable book rises to the challenge of making engrossing sense of those remains. What kind of town was it? What can it actually tell us about life then - from sex to politics, food to religion, slavery to literacy?A number of myths have to be exploded - the very da ...

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1888 London Murders in the Year of the Ripper (by Peter Stubley)

The History Press Ltd (01 Sep, 2012)

In 1888 Jack the Ripper made the headlines with a series of horrific murders that remain unsolved to this day. But most killers are not shadowy figures stalking the streets with a lust for blood. Many are ordinary citizens driven to the ultimate crime by circumstance, a fit of anger or a desire for revenge. Their crimes, overshadowed by the few, sensational cases, are ignored, forgotten or written off. This ...

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Stanley: The Impossible Life of Africa's Greatest Explorer (by Tim Jeal)

Faber and Faber (06 Mar, 2008)

The tragic life of the most brilliant adventurer in the great age of exploration. Henry Morton Stanley was a cruel imperialist - a bad man of Africa - who connived with King Leopold II of Belgium in horrific crimes against the people of the Congo. He also conducted the most legendary celebrity interview in history, remembered in the words `Dr Livingstone, I presume?' Or so we think: but as Tim Jea ...

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