Books

Page 5 of 20, showing 12 records out of 237 total, starting on record 49, ending on 60

The Armstrong Girl (by Cathy Le Feuvre)

Lion Books (15 May, 2015)

In November 1885 Victorian England was scandalised by a court case which lifted the veil on prostitution and the sex trade. In the Old Bailey dock was the editor of the Pall Mall Gazette, which had recently published a series of articles on the sex trade; a reformed brothel keeper; and the second-in-command of The Salvation Army, Bramwell Booth. The group was accused of abducting a 13 year old girl, Eliza ...

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Escape from Camp 14: One man's remarkable odyssey from North Korea to freedom in the West (by Blaine Harden)

Mantle (29 Mar, 2012)

Shin Dong-hyuk was born in the early 1980s inside Camp 14, one of five sprawling political prisons in the mountains of North Korea. Located about 55 miles north of Pyongyang, the labour camp is a 'complete control district,' a no-exit prison where the only sentence is life. No one born in Camp 14 or in any North Korean political prison camp has escaped. No one except Shin. This is his story.

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Did She Kill Him?: A Victorian tale of deception, adultery and arsenic (by Kate Colquhoun)

Little, Brown Book Group (06 Mar, 2014)

In the summer of 1889, young Southern belle Florence Maybrick stood trial for the alleged arsenic poisoning of her much older husband, Liverpool cotton merchant James Maybrick. 'The Maybrick Mystery' had all the makings of a sensation: a pretty, flirtatious young girl; resentful, gossiping servants; rumours of gambling and debt; and torrid mutual infidelity. The case cracked the varnish of Victorian ...

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The Secret Rooms: A True Gothic Mystery (by Catherine Bailey)

Penguin (01 Nov, 2012)

A plotting Duchess, a mysterious death and a castle full of lies in Catherine Bailey's The Secret Rooms.



At 6 am on 21 April 1940 John the 9th Duke of Rutland, and one of Britain's wealthiest men, ended his days, virtually alone, lying on a makeshift bed in a dank cramped suite of rooms in the servants' quarters of his own home, Belvoir Castle, in Lei ...

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Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China (by Jung Chang)

Vintage Digital (26 Sep, 2013)

In this groundbreaking biography, Jung Chang vividly describes how Empress Dowager Cixi – the most important woman in Chinese history – brought a medieval empire into the modern age. Under her, the ancient country attained virtually all the attributes of a modern state and it was she who abolished gruesome punishments like ‘death by a thousand cuts’ and put an end to foot-binding. Jung Chang compreh ...

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One Summer: America 1927 (by Bill Bryson)

Transworld Digital (26 Sep, 2013)

In summer 1927, America had a booming stock market, a president who worked just four hours a day (and slept much of the rest), a devastating flood of the Mississippi, a sensational murder trial, and an unknown aviator named Charles Lindbergh who became the most famous man on earth. It was the summer that saw the birth of talking pictures, the invention of television, the peak of Al Capone’s reign of ...

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The Creation of Anne Boleyn (by Susan Bordo)

Oneworld Publications (01 Feb, 2014)

Part biography, part cultural history, The Creation of Anne Boleyn is a fascinating reconstruction of Anne's life and an illuminating look at her afterlife in the popular imagination. Why is Anne so compelling? Why has she inspired such extreme reactions? What did she really even look like?! And perhaps the most provocative questions concern Anne's death more than her life. How could Henry order the executi ...

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The Thomas the Tank Engine Man (by Brian Sibley)

Lion Books (15 May, 2015)

The stories of Thomas the Tank Engine and his friends have delighted generations of children and adults, but what do we know of the man who created them? A devoted pastor and family man, the Reverend W Awdry first started telling the stories in order to amuse his own children, with no idea that the characters would lead to a global phenomenon that now, seventy years after their first appearance, shows no si ...

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Shakespeare's Restless World: An Unexpected History in Twenty Objects (by Dr Neil MacGregor)

Allen Lane (11 Oct, 2012)

Shakespeare lived through a pivotal period in human history. With the discovery of the New World, the horizons of Old Europe were expanding dramatically - and long-cherished certainties were crumbling. Life was exhilaratingly uncertain. What were Londoners thinking when they went to see Shakespeare's plays? What was it like living in their world? Here Neil MacGregor looks at twenty objects from Shakespeare' ...

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The Last Word: Tales from the Tip of the Mother Tongue (by Ben Macintyre)

Bloomsbury Paperbacks (01 Jun, 2011)

Do you know your geek-speak from your geek-chic? Ever wanted to put Humpty Dumpty together again? Can you distinguish Spanglish from Chinglish? We adapt words from other languages, from slang, from developments in science, literature and art. Learn the advantages of having your own signature word; why the lifts in the House of Commons have posh accents; and discover the discreet art of the loophemism.

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Catherine the Great: The story of the impoverished German princess who deposed her husband to become (by Robert K. Massie)

Head of Zeus (17 Jul, 2012)

The story of one of the truly great female rulers in history by an award winning historian. The daughter of an impoverished aristocrat, Catherine was married aged 16 to Grand Duke Peter, heir to the throne of all the Russias, a feckless teenager with a weakness for drink. Catherine was only able to give him an heir by passing off her lover's son as his own. In 1762, Catherine rode out of St Peters ...

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As Good as God, as Clever as the Devil: The Impossible Life of Mary Benson : The Extraordinary Story (by Rodney Bolt)

Atlantic Books (01 Jun, 2012)

Young Minnie Sidgwick was just twelve years old when her cousin, twenty-three-year old Edward Benson, proposed to her in 1853. Edward went on to become Archbishop of Canterbury and little Minnie - as Mary Benson - to preside over Lambeth Palace, and a social world that ranged from Tennyson and Browning to foreign royalty and Queen Victoria herself. Prime Minister William Gladstone called her 'the cleverest ...

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