Books

Page 4 of 8, showing 12 records out of 91 total, starting on record 37, ending on 48

Blood and Guts: A Short History of Medicine (by Roy Porter)

Penguin (26 Jun, 2003)

Mankind's battle to stay alive is the greatest of all subjects. This brief, witty and unusual book by Britain's greatest medical historian compresses into a tiny span a lifetime spent thinking about millennia of human ingenuity in the quest to cheat death. Each chapter sums up one of these battlefields (surgery, doctors, disease, hospitals, laboratories and the human body) in a way that is both frightening ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Cruel Mother: A family ghost laid to rest (by Siân Busby)

Short Books (07 Mar, 2013)

In 1919 Siân Busby’s great-grandmother, Beth, gave birth to triplets. One of the babies died at birth and eleven days later she drowned the surviving twins in a bath of cold water. She was sentenced to an indefinite term of imprisonment at Broadmoor. The murder, and the deep sense of shame it generated, resounded through the lives of Beth’s grandchildren and great-grandchildren. In Siân’s case, ill- ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

Agent Zigzag: The True Wartime Story of Eddie Chapman: Lover, Traitor, Hero, Spy (reissued) (by Ben Macintyre)

Bloomsbury Publishing (17 Aug, 2009)

One December night in 1942, a Nazi parachutist landed in a Cambridgeshire field. His mission: to sabotage the British war effort. His name was Eddie Chapman, but he would shortly become MI5's Agent Zigzag. Dashing and louche, courageous and unpredictable, the traitor was a patriot inside, and the villain a hero. The problem for Chapman, his many lovers and his spymasters was knowing who he was. Ben Macintyr ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Blood River: A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart (by Tim Butcher)

Vintage Digital (15 Dec, 2010)

When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to cover Africa in 2000 he quickly became obsessed with the idea of recreating H.M. Stanley's famous expedition - but travelling alone. Despite warnings that his plan was 'suicidal', Butcher set out for the Congo's eastern border with just a rucksack and a few thousand dollars hidden in his boots. Making his way in an assortment of vessels inc ...

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2.0 Stars2.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

In These Times: Living in Britain through Napoleon's Wars, 1793-1815 (by Jenny Uglow)

Faber & Faber Non Fiction (04 Nov, 2014)

We know the thrilling, terrible stories of the battles of the Napoleonic wars - but what of those left behind? The people on a Norfolk farm, in a Yorkshire mill, a Welsh iron foundry, an Irish village, a London bank or a Scottish mountain? The aristocrats and paupers, old and young, butchers and bakers and candlestick makers - how did the war touch their lives? Every part of Britain felt the long twe ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Edward VI (Penguin Monarchs): The Last Boy King (by Stephen Alford)

Allen Lane (04 Dec, 2014)

Edward VI, the only son of Henry VIII, became king at the age of nine and died wholly unexpectedly at the age of fifteen. All around him loomed powerful men who hoped to use the child to further their own ends, but who were also playing a long game - assuming that Edward would long outlive them and become as commanding a figure as his father had been.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Worst Street in London: Foreword by Peter Ackroyd (by Fiona Rule)

Ian Allan (10 Oct, 2011)

Halfway up Commercial Street, one block away from Spitalfields Market, lies an anonymous service road. The average pedestrian wouldn't even notice it existed. But unlikely though it may seem, this characterless, 400ft strip of tarmac was once Dorset Street - the most notorious thoroughfare in the Capital; the worst street in London and the resort of Protestant fire-brands, thieves, con-men, pimps, prostitut ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Victorian House: Domestic Life from Childbirth to Deathbed (by Judith Flanders)

Harper Perennial (02 Aug, 2004)

The Victorian age is both recent and unimaginably distant. In the most prosperous and technologically advanced nation in the world, people carried slops up and down stairs; buried meat in fresh earth to prevent mould forming; wrung sheets out in boiling water with their bare hands. This drudgery was routinely performed by the parents of people still living, but the knowledge of it has passed as if it had ne ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Very British Murder (by Lucy Worsley)

BBC Digital (12 Sep, 2013)

This is the story of a national obsession. Ever since the Ratcliffe Highway Murders caused a nation-wide panic in Regency England, the British have taken an almost ghoulish pleasure in 'a good murder'. This fascination helped create a whole new world of entertainment, inspiring novels, plays and films, puppet shows, paintings and true-crime journalism - as well as an army of fictional detectives who ...

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The Woman Who Would Be King (by Kara Cooney)

Crown (14 Oct, 2014)

Hatshepsut—the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty—was born into a privileged position in the royal household, and she was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father’s family. Her failure to produce a male heir was ultimately the twist of fate that paved the way for her improbable rule as a cross-dressing king. At ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage to the Antarctic (by Alfred Lansing)

Phoenix (04 May, 2000)

In the summer of 1914, Sir Ernest Shackleton set off aboard the Endur ance bound for the South Atlantic. The goal of his expedition was to cross t he Antarctic overland, but more than a year later, and still half a continent aw ay from the intended base, the Endurance was trapped in ice and eventuall y was crushed. For five months Shackleton and his crew survived on drifting ice packs in one of the most sav ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Steady Running of the Hour (by Justin Go)

William Heinemann Ltd (08 May, 2014)

Just after graduating college, Tristan Campbell receives a letter delivered by special courier to his apartment in San Francisco. It contains the phone number of a Mr. J.F. Prichard of Twyning & Hooper, Solicitors, in London - and news that could change Tristan's life forever. In 1924, Prichard explains, an English alpinist named Ashley Walsingham died attempting to summit Mt. Everest, leaving his fo ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
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