Books

Page 4 of 20, showing 12 records out of 237 total, starting on record 37, ending on 48

The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language (by Mark Forsyth)

Icon Books Ltd (06 Sep, 2012)

What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled? What links church organs to organised crime, California to the Caliphate, or brackets to codpieces? The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth's Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words. It's an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Joan of Arc (by Helen Castor)

Faber & Faber Non Fiction (30 Sep, 2014)

Acclaimed historian Helen Castor brings us afresh a gripping life of Joan of Arc. Instead of the icon, she gives us a living, breathing young woman; a roaring girl fighting the English, and taking sides in a bloody civil war that was tearing fifteenth century France apart. Here is a portrait of a 19-year-old peasant who hears voices from God; a teenager transformed into a warrior leading an army to victo ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Road to Little Dribbling: More Notes From a Small Island (by Bill Bryson)

Transworld Digital (08 Oct, 2015)

Twenty years ago, Bill Bryson went on a trip around Britain to celebrate the green and kindly island that had become his adopted country. The hilarious book that resulted, Notes from a Small Island, was taken to the nation’s heart and became the bestselling travel book ever, and was also voted in a BBC poll the book that best represents Britain.Now, to mark the twentieth anniversary of that modern classic ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Secret Life of Bletchley Park: The WWII Codebreaking Centre and the Men and Women Who Worked The (by Sinclair McKay)

Aurum Press (01 Apr, 2011)

Bletchley Park was where one of the war’s most famous – and crucial – achievements was made: the cracking of Germany’s “Enigma” code in which its most important military communications were couched. This country house in the Buckinghamshire countryside was home to Britain’s most brilliant mathematical brains, like Alan Turing, and the scene of immense advances in technology – indeed, the bir ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Floating Brothel: The Extraordinary True Story of an Eighteenth Century Ship and its Cargo of F (by Siân Rees)

Thistle Publishing (29 Mar, 2015)

In July 1789, 237 women convicts left England for Sydney, Australia, destined to provide the men in Britain's newest colony with sexual favours and domesticity. This is the extraordinary story of those 'disorderly girls' and their 13-month voyage, in which the sights, smells and sounds of an 18th century sailing ship are brought vividly to life. The Lady Juliana both held her convicts prisoner and offere ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Just My Type: A Book About Fonts (by Simon Garfield)

Profile Books (22 Sep, 2011)

Just My Type is not just a font book, but a book of stories. About how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. About why Barack Obama opted for Gotham, while Amy Winehouse found her soul in 30s Art Deco. About the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, or people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook, or Margaret Calvert, who invented the motorway signs that are used from Watford ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Matilda: Wife of the Conqueror, First Queen of England (by Tracy Borman)

Vintage (06 Sep, 2012)

Matilda, wife of William the Conqueror, was the first woman to be crowned Queen of England and formally recognised as such by her subjects. Beyond this, however, little is known of her. No contemporary images of her remain, and the chroniclers of her age left us only the faintest clues as to her life. Who was this spectral queen? In this first major biography, Tracy Borman sifts through the shards of evi ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Devonshires: The Story of a Family and a Nation (by Roy Hattersley)

Vintage (08 May, 2014)

William Cavendish, the father of the first Earl, dissolved monasteries for Henry VIII. Bess, his second wife, was gaoler-companion to Mary Queen of Scots during her long imprisonment in England. Arbella Stuart, their granddaughter, was a heartbeat away from the throne of England and their grandson, the Lord General of the North, fought to save the crown for Charles I. With the help of previously unpublis ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime (Wellcome) (by Val McDermid)

Profile Books (05 Feb, 2015)

The dead talk. To the right listener, they tell us all about themselves: where they came from, how they lived, how they died - and who killed them. Forensic scientists can unlock the mysteries of the past and help justice to be done using the messages left by a corpse, a crime scene or the faintest of human traces. Forensics draws on interviews with top-level professionals, ground-breaking research and V ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

It's All in Your Head: True Stories of Imaginary Illness (by Suzanne O'Sullivan)

Chatto & Windus (04 Jun, 2015)

'Even if medical tests cannot explain your pain or tiredness or disability, it does not lessen your suffering. The pain of medically unexplained illness is every bit as real as any other and, if anything, is multiplied by the lack of understanding.' Most of us accept the way our heart flutters when we set eyes on the one we secretly admire, or the sweat on our brow as we start the presentation we do not ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Church of Fear: Inside The Weird World of Scientology (by John Sweeney)

Silvertail Books (07 Jan, 2013)

Tom Cruise and John Travolta say the Church of Scientology is a force for good. Others disagree. Award-winning journalist John Sweeney investigated the Church for more than half a decade. During that time he was intimidated, spied on and followed and the results were spectacular: Sweeney lost his temper with the Church's spokesman on camera and his infamous 'exploding tomato' clip was seen by millions aroun ...

Buy Now See Reviews

This book has not yet been reviewed.

 
 

The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, the Real Moriarty (by Ben Macintyre)

HarperPress (05 Jan, 2012)

The rumbustious true story of the Victorian master thief who was the model for Conan Doyle’s Moriarty, Sherlock Holmes’ arch-rival. From the bestselling author of ‘Operation Mincemeat’ and ‘Agent Zigzag’. Adam Worth was the greatest master criminal of Victorian times. Abjuring violence and setting himself up as a perfectly respectable gentleman, he became the ringleader for the largest crimin ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9