Books

Page 4 of 7, showing 12 records out of 78 total, starting on record 37, ending on 48

Moab Is My Washpot (by Stephen Fry)

Arrow (06 Jan, 2011)

A memoir that tells how, sent to a boarding school 200 miles from home at the age of seven, the author survived beatings, misery, love, ecstasy, carnal violation, expulsion, imprisonment, criminal conviction, probation and catastrophe to emerge, at eighteen, ready to try and face the world in which he had always felt a stranger.

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This book has not yet been reviewed.

 
 

Monsoon Diary: Reveries and Recipes from South India (by Shoba Narayan)

Bantam Books (Transworld Publishers a division of the Random House Group) (02 Aug, 2004)

MONSOON DIARY weaves a fascinating food narrative that combines authentic vegetarian recipes from South India with tales from Shoba Narayan's life, stories of her delightfully eccentric family, and reflections on Indian culture. Shoba recounts her childhood in South India, a portrait of small-town life richly populated by characters like the flower woman who brings jasmine for the gods, the milkman who name ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Mrs Griffin Sends Her Love: and other writings (by Miss Read)

Orion (24 Oct, 2013)

From organising the school summer fete... 'Because of our inability to recognise our climatic shortcomings from the outset, arrangements for outdoor jollities get completely out of hand'. ...to the sometimes rather odd passions of childhood: 'I collect stones with holes in them'. Miss Read captures the essence of rural life, and in particular of village schools, as only she can. This collection ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Family's Nazi Past (by Jennifer Teege, Nikola Sellmair)

Hodder & Stoughton (24 Sep, 2015)

When Jennifer Teege, a German-Nigerian woman, happened to pluck a library book from the shelf, she had no idea that her life would be irrevocably altered. Recognising photos of her mother and grandmother in the book, she discovers a horrifying fact: Her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the vicious Nazi commandant chillingly depicted by Ralph Fiennes in Schindler's List - a man known and reviled the world over. ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

My Life in Houses (by Margaret Forster)

Vintage Digital (06 Nov, 2014)

‘I was born on May 25, 1938, in the front bedroom of a house in Orton Road, on the outer edges of Raffles, a council estate. I was a lucky girl.’ So begins Margaret Forster’s journey through the houses she’s lived in, from that sparkling new council house, built as part of a utopian vision by Carlisle City Council, to her beloved London house of today, via Oxford, Hampstead, the Lake District ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

My Secret Sister: Jenny Lucas and Helen Edwards' family story (by Jenny Lee Smith, Helen Edwards)

Pan (14 Mar, 2013)

My Secret Sister The powerful story of two sisters separated at birth, one abused and one loved, and their search to understand their past.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Neither Nowt Nor Summat: In search of the meaning of Yorkshire (by Ian McMillan)

Ebury Digital (25 Jun, 2015)

I’m going to define the essence of this sprawling place as best I can. I’m going to start here, in this village, and radiate out like a ripple in a pond. I don’t want to go to the obvious places, either; I want to be like a bus driver on my first morning on the job, getting gloriously lost, turning up where I shouldn’t. I’m going to confirm or deny the clichés, holding them up to see where th ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Nowhere to Run: Where do you go when there's nowhere left to hide? (by Judy Westwater)

Harper Element (02 Apr, 2010)

How can you forget your past when it keeps coming back to haunt you? Judy Westwater, the Sunday Times bestselling author of Street Kid, was determined to turn her back on her cruel and violent childhood. She didn't stand a chance. All too soon hope turned to fear and she knew she'd have to run again. Judy was only 11 years old when she was forced to live on the streets. Beaten, half-starved and horrifically ...

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On Rue Tatin: The Simple Pleasures of Life in a Small French Town (by Susan Loomis)

HarperCollins (05 Jun, 2002)

For an expat chef to live on a French street named after a recipe is almost beyond belief. Yet On rue Tatin is so inviting the that the book's recipes are only incidental to Susan Loomis's stories about living in France. Setting up house in a foreign country is a genre that draws any reader who relishes the struggles from arm's length. It would be a shame, though, to limit Loomis's audience to Francophiles ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

One Pair of Hands: From Upstairs to Downstairs, in this charming 1930s memoir (by Monica Dickens)

Ebury Press (15 Sep, 2011)

'Life was a wordless battle of wits between us, with her keeping a sharp look-out for signs of neglect, and me trying to disguise my slovenliness by subterfuge. I became an adept at sweeping dust under the bed, and always used the same few pieces of silver' Unimpressed by the world of debutante balls, Monica Dickens shocked her family by getting a job. With no experience whatsoever, she gained employment ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit (by Jeanette Winterson)

Vintage (03 Dec, 2009)

This is the story of Jeanette, adopted and brought up by her mother as one of God's elect. Zealous and passionate, she seems seems destined for life as a missionary, but then she falls for one of her converts. At sixteen, Jeanette decides to leave the church, her home and her family, for the young woman she loves. Innovative, punchy and tender, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a few days ride into the biza ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Over Hill and Dale (by Gervase Phinn)

Penguin (24 Sep, 2009)

Gervase Phinn begins his second year as a schools inspector in Yorkshire. Gervase's colleagues rag him unmercifully about his faraway look whenever the name of Christine Bentley of WinneryNook Nursery and Primary School is mentioned, and he realises it is time to take action - but how to put the question?

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
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