Books

Page 3 of 20, showing 12 records out of 237 total, starting on record 25, ending on 36

Thomas Hardy: The Time-torn Man (by Claire Tomalin)

Penguin (21 Jun, 2012)

Paradox ruled Thomas Hardy's life. His birth was almost his death; he became one of the great Victorian novelists and reinvented himself as one of the twentieth-century's greatest poets; he was an unhappy husband and a desolate widower; he wrote bitter attacks on the English class system yet prized the friendship of aristocrats. In the hands of Whitbread Award-winning biographer Claire Tomalin, author of ...

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Those Wild Wyndhams: Three Sisters at the Heart of Power (by Claudia Renton)

William Collins (20 Nov, 2014)

Mary, Madeline and Pamela – the three beautiful Wyndham sisters – were born into immense wealth. Cultured bohemian daughters of a maverick politician and an artistic mother, they became entangled with the scandalous and intellectual ‘Souls’ set, as well as the most celebrated figures of the day, including Oscar Wilde, Marie Stopes and the iconoclastic poet Wilfrid Scawen Blunt, lover both of Mary an ...

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Magna Carta: The Making and Legacy of the Great Charter (by Dan Jones)

Head of Zeus (04 Dec, 2014)

On a summer's day in 1215 a beleaguered English monarch met a group of disgruntled barons in a meadow by the river Thames named Runnymede. Beset by foreign crisis and domestic rebellion, King John was fast running out of options. On 15 June he reluctantly agreed to fix his regal seal to a document that would change the world. A milestone in the development of constitutional politics and the rule of law, ...

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If Walls Could Talk: An intimate history of the home (by Lucy Worsley)

Faber & Faber (05 Jan, 2012)

If Walls Could Talk Why did the flushing toilet take two centuries to catch on? Why did Samuel Pepys never give his mistresses an orgasm? Why did medieval people sleep sitting up? When were the two 'dirty centuries'? Why did gas lighting cause Victorian ladies to faint? Why, for centuries, did people fear fruit? This title answers these questions. Full description

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The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse: An Extraordinary Edwardian Case of Deception (by Piu Marie Eatwell)

Head of Zeus (07 May, 2015)

The extraordinary story of the Druce-Portland affair, one of the most notorious, tangled and bizarre legal cases of the late Victorian and Edwardian eras. In 1897 an elderly widow, Anna Maria Druce, made a strange request of the London Ecclesiastical Court: it was for the exhumation of the grave of her late father-in-law, T.C. Druce. Behind her application lay a sensational claim: that Druce had been ...

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Columbine (by Dave Cullen)

Old Street Publishing (17 Mar, 2010)

On 20th April 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold made their bid to leave 'a lasting impression on the world'. They drove to school, planted two huge bombs in the dining area, then positioned themselves outside the main entrance to pick off the fleeing teachers and students. The bombs failed, but the ensuing massacre defined a new brand of school violence - one that has started to cross the Atlantic. In the ...

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Making It Up As I Go Along (by Marian Keyes)

Michael Joseph (11 Feb, 2016)

'Fabulous shoes, my badly made stews, an Antarctic cruise and ten pounds to lose. Having to schmooze when I'd far rather snooze. Skin care and bad hair and what should I wear? All kinds of views, which I hope will amuse...' Welcome to the magnificent Making It Up as I Go Along - aka the World According to Marian Keyes (trade mark) - A bold, brilliant book bursting with Marian's hilarious and heartfelt obser ...

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Anita and Me (by Meera Syal)

Flamingo (07 Apr, 1997)

It’s 1972. Meena is nine years old and lives in the village of Tollington, ‘the jewel of the Black Country’. She is the daughter of Indian parents who have come to England to give her a better life. As one of the few Punjabi inhabitants of her village, her daily struggle for independence is different from most. She wants fishfingers and chips, not chapati and dhal; she wants an English Christmas, not ...

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Howards End is on the Landing: A year of reading from home (by Susan Hill)

Profile Books (08 Oct, 2009)

Early one autumn afternoon in pursuit of an elusive book on her shelves, Susan Hill encountered dozens of others that she had never read, or forgotten she owned, or wanted to read for a second time. The discovery inspired her to embark on a year-long voyage through her books, forsaking new purchases in order to get to know her own collection again. A book which is left on a shelf for a decade is a dead t ...

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At Speed (by Mark Cavendish)

Ebury Digital (07 Nov, 2013)

Mark Cavendish is the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France's green jersey, the first to wear the iconic rainbow jersey in almost 50 years and our only ever rider to capture the Giro d'Italia points title. He is the most prolific sprinter in the Tour's history, and - according to L'Equipe - the best sprinter of all time. But smashing records and racking up victories means whole new levels of fame: ...

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Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth (by Reza Aslan)

The Westbourne Press (03 Mar, 2014)

Sifting through centuries of mythmaking, Reza Aslan sheds new light on one of history s most influential and enigmatic figures. He examines Jesus within the context of the times in which he lived: the age of zealotry, an era awash in apocalyptic fervour, when scores of would-be messiahs preached holy war against Roman occupation and were executed for sedition. Zealot provides a fresh perspective on one o ...

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The Cruel Mother (by Sian Busby)

Short Books Ltd (19 May, 2005)

In 1919 Sian Busby's great-grandmother, Beth, gave birth to triplets. One of the babies died at birth and eleven days later she drowned the surviving twins in a bath of cold water. She was sentenced to an indefinite term of imprisonment at Broadmoor. The murder and the deep sense of shame it generated obviously affected Beth, her husband and their surviving children to an extraordinary degree, but it also r ...

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