Books

Page 2 of 232, showing 12 records out of 2784 total, starting on record 13, ending on 24

Truecrime

Sceptre (21 Jun, 2004)

It's 1995 and crime is the new cool. New lads meet old lags, celebrity villains mix with media types and Cool Britannia is stripped bare. Welcome to Cruel Britannia.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

SS-GB (by Len Deighton)

HarperCollins Publishers Ltd (28 May, 2009)

In February 1941 British command surrendered to the Nazis. For nine months Britain has been occupied. An alternative spy novel.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (by Baroness P. D. James)

Faber and Faber (05 Jan, 2006)

Cordelia Gray saw no reason why her job as a private detective was an unsuitable job for a woman. Until she was employed to discover why a renowned scientist's son had comitted suicide. And she discovered his family's secrets.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Uncommon Reader (by Alan Bennett)

Faber & Faber / Profile Books (26 Jun, 2008)

Walking the corgis one evening the Queen encounters a mobile library and borrows a book to be polite. Nothing in the palace will ever be the same again.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Fallen into the Pit (by Ellis Peters)

Time Warner Paperbacks (28 Feb, 1991)

In the aftermath of the war, the murder of a Nazi land-worker in an English village presents a hatful of potential suspects.

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Caroline's Sister (by Sheila O'Flanagan)

Headline Review (05 Jun, 2006)

Caroline has so much. Great looks, easy charm and enough brains to get a decent job. And the first time she sleeps with her new boyfriend she gets pregnant and she wants to keep the baby.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Saint Maybe (by Anne Tyler)

Vintage (19 Jun, 2008)

When 18 year old Ian procks the bubble of his family's optimistic self-deception, his brother drives into a wall, his sister-in-law falls apart and his parents age before is eyes. Consumed with guilt, Ian seeks forgiveness.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Dragonsbane (Unicorn) (by Barbara Hambly)

Voyager (17 Aug, 1998)

It was said to be impossible to slay a dragon but Lord John Aversin had done so once and earned the title of Dragonsbane and the dubious honour of a starring role in stories and ballads. But now he is being asked to do it again ....

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Village Newcomers (Tales from Turnham Malpas) (by Rebecca Shaw)

Orion (02 Sep, 2010)

Two newcomers arrive in Turnham Malpas, creating drama and upheaval. Another warm, witty and lively tale of village life from bestselling author Rebecca Shaw.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

London Under London: A Subterranean Guide (by Richard Trench, Ellis Hillman)

John Murray Publishers Ltd (23 Sep, 1993)

A fascinating description of what was & is under modern day London from wire and tunnels to burials and archeological finds.

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Necropolis: London and Its Dead (by Catharine Arnold)

Pocket Books (05 Mar, 2007)

Offering an historical narrative of London's attitude to going the way of all flesh, this book blends archaeology, architecture and anecdotes in order to document the rise of the undertaking trade, covering everything from the pageantry of state funerals to public executions and bodysnatching.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

Savage Girls and Wild Boys: A History of Feral Children (by Michael Newton)

Faber and Faber (17 Feb, 2003)

In Savage Girls and Wild Boys, Newton tackles the perennially compelling topic of children raised by animals. He examines the lives of these children, of the adults who rescued them and asks what they can teach us about notions of civilisation.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
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