Books

Page 1 of 13, showing 12 records out of 147 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

84 Charing Cross Road (by H. Hanff)

Time Warner Paperbacks (24 Jun, 1993)

This book is the very simple story of the love affair between Miss Helene Hanff of New York and Messrs Marks & Co, sellers of rare and secondhand books, at 84 Charing Cross Road, London.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

Captivated: J.M. Barrie, the Du Mauriers and the Dark Side of Neverland (by Piers Dudgeon)

Chatto & Windus (10 Jul, 2008)

Captivated is the story of the interwoven lives of the Du Maurier family, the Llewellyn-Davies family & J.M.Barrie the creator of Peter Pan. It focuses on the dark side of their relationships including Gerald Du Maurier's involvement with hypnotism & the power that JM Barrie was seen to have over the families.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Shakespeare's Wife (by Germaine Greer)

Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (01 Sep, 2008)

This is a biography of Ann Hathaway and a social history of Shakespeare's time by the redoubtable Germaine Greer.

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2.5 Stars2.5 Stars2.5 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

Colours Of The Mountain (by Da Chen)

Arrow (03 Aug, 2000)

A book about friendships, prejudice, familial love and academic striving, and of one man's escape from hunger, poverty and ignorance, Colours of the Mountain is an inspiring and eloquently recounted memoir of growing up a pariah in rural China.

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

White Mischief (by James Fox)

Vintage (05 Feb, 1998)

Just before 3am on January 24th, 1941, when Britain was preoccupied with surviving the Blitz, the body of Josslyn Hay, Earl of Erroll, was discovered lying on the floor of his Buick, at a road intersection some miles outside Nairobi, with a bullet in his head. A leading figure in Kenya's colonial community, he had recently been appointed Military Secretary, but he was primarily a seducer of other men's wive ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Four Queens: The Provencal Sisters Who Ruled Europe (by Nancy Goldstone)

Phoenix (01 Jun, 2009)

The four beautiful, cultured and clever daughters of the Count and Countess of Provence made illustrious marriages and lived at the epicentre of political power and intrigue in 13th-century Europe.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self (by Claire Tomalin)

Penguin (03 Jul, 2003)

Pepys wrote his diary throughout the 1660s and this book vividly brings to life the tumultuous world of 17-century London. Pepys' life spanned the execution of one king and the restoration of another, and Tomalin elegantly recreates both Pepys' public and private lives from his early days in London and then Cambridge through his rise in the bureaucracy of the restored king, Charles II, to his position as e ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Bookseller of Kabul (by ├ůsne Seierstad)

Virago Press Ltd (04 Mar, 2004)

In the spring of 2002, journalist ├ůsne Seierstad went to Afghanistan to live with a family for several months. Here she reveals her experiences, telling the story of Sultan Khan - who defied the authorities for 20 years to supply books to the people of Kabul - and his family.

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This book has not yet been reviewed.

 
 

A Forever Family (by Michael Jones)

Faber and Faber (01 Feb, 2007)

John Houghton and his wife learned that they could not have children of their own. Instead they adopted three siblings, two boys and a girl, who were looking for 'a forever family', as the adoption agencies put it. What followed is all too common in adoptive families, but it is rarely talked about in public.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher (by Kate Summerscale)

Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (26 Jul, 2008)

In the village of Road in Wiltshire during the summer of 1860, a family awakes to discover that a gruesome murder has taken place in their home. The guilty party is surely still among them. Jack Wilcher of Scotland Yard, the most celebrated detective of his day, has the unenviable task of conducting the investigation.

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4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

Toast: The Story of a Boy's Hunger (by Nigel Slater)

Harper Perennial (16 Apr, 2004)

TOAST is Nigel Slater's truly extraordinary story of a childhood remembered through food. Whether relating his mother's ritual burning of the toast, his father's dreaded Boxing Day stew or such culinary highlights of the day as Arctic Roll and Grilled Grapefruit (then considered somehting of a status symbol in Wolverhampton) this remarkable memoir vividly recreates daily life in sixties surburban England. H ...

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Moab Is My Washpot (by Stephen Fry)

Arrow (06 Jan, 2011)

A memoir that tells how, sent to a boarding school 200 miles from home at the age of seven, the author survived beatings, misery, love, ecstasy, carnal violation, expulsion, imprisonment, criminal conviction, probation and catastrophe to emerge, at eighteen, ready to try and face the world in which he had always felt a stranger.

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