Books

Page 1 of 8, showing 12 records out of 91 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

Edward VI (Penguin Monarchs): The Last Boy King (by Stephen Alford)

Allen Lane (04 Dec, 2014)

Edward VI, the only son of Henry VIII, became king at the age of nine and died wholly unexpectedly at the age of fifteen. All around him loomed powerful men who hoped to use the child to further their own ends, but who were also playing a long game - assuming that Edward would long outlive them and become as commanding a figure as his father had been.

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Shakespeare's Restless World: An Unexpected History in Twenty Objects (by Dr Neil MacGregor)

Allen Lane (11 Oct, 2012)

Shakespeare lived through a pivotal period in human history. With the discovery of the New World, the horizons of Old Europe were expanding dramatically - and long-cherished certainties were crumbling. Life was exhilaratingly uncertain. What were Londoners thinking when they went to see Shakespeare's plays? What was it like living in their world? Here Neil MacGregor looks at twenty objects from Shakespeare' ...

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Margaret Beaufort: Mother of the Tudor Dynasty (by Elizabeth Norton)

Amberley Publishing (01 Sep, 2010)

Divorced at ten, a mother at thirteen & three times a widow. The extraordinary true story of the 'Red Queen', Lady Margaret Beaufort, matriarch of the Tudors. Born in the midst of the Wars of the Roses, Margaret Beaufort became the greatest heiress of her time. She survived a turbulent life, marrying four times and enduring imprisonment before passing her claim to the crown of England to her son, Henry VII, ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History (by Robert M. Edsel)

Arrow (03 Jun, 2010)

What if I told you that there was an epic story about World War II that has not been told, involving the most unlikely group of heroes? What if I told you there was a group of men on the front lines who didn’t carry machine guns or drive tanks; a new kind of soldier, one charged with saving, not destroying. From caves to castles in a thrilling race against time, these men risked their lives daily to sav ...

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Lemon Sherbet and Dolly Blue: The Story of an Accidental Family (by Lynn Knight)

Atlantic Books (01 Aug, 2011)

150 Station Road, Wheeldon Mill - a short stride across the Chesterfield Canal in the heart of Derbyshire - was home to the Nash family and their corner shop, which served a small mining community with everything from Brasso and Dolly Blue, to cheap dress rings and bright sugary sweets. But just as this was no ordinary home, theirs was no ordinary family. Lynn Knight tells the remarkable story of the three ...

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The Secret Life of Bletchley Park: The WWII Codebreaking Centre and the Men and Women Who Worked The (by Sinclair McKay)

Aurum Press (01 Apr, 2011)

Bletchley Park was where one of the war’s most famous – and crucial – achievements was made: the cracking of Germany’s “Enigma” code in which its most important military communications were couched. This country house in the Buckinghamshire countryside was home to Britain’s most brilliant mathematical brains, like Alan Turing, and the scene of immense advances in technology – indeed, the bir ...

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Doc (by Mary Doria Russell)

Ballantine Books Inc. (06 Mar, 2012)

Born to the life of a Southern gentleman, Dr. John Henry Holliday arrives on the Texas frontier hoping that the dry air and sunshine of the West will restore him to health. Soon, with few job prospects, Doc Holliday is gambling professionally with his partner, Maria Katarina Harony, a high-strung, classically educated Hungarian whore. In search of high-stakes poker, the couple hits the saloons of Dodge City ...

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A Very British Murder (by Lucy Worsley)

BBC Digital (12 Sep, 2013)

This is the story of a national obsession. Ever since the Ratcliffe Highway Murders caused a nation-wide panic in Regency England, the British have taken an almost ghoulish pleasure in 'a good murder'. This fascination helped create a whole new world of entertainment, inspiring novels, plays and films, puppet shows, paintings and true-crime journalism - as well as an army of fictional detectives who ...

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When I Heard the Bell: The Loss of the Iolaire (by John Macleod)

Birlinn Ltd (03 May, 2010)

On 31 December 1918, hours from the first New Year of peace, hundreds of Royal Naval Reservists from the Isle of Lewis poured off successive trains onto the quayside at Kyle of Lochalsh. A chaotic Admiralty had made no adequate arrangements for their safe journey home. Corners were cut, an elderly and recently requisitioned steam-yacht was sent from Stornoway, and that evening HMY Iolaire sailed from Kyle o ...

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At Home: A short history of private life (by Bill Bryson)

Black Swan (26 May, 2011)

What does history really consists of? Centuries of people quietly going about their daily business - sleeping, eating, having sex, endeavouring to get comfortable. And where did all these normal activities take place? At home. This was the thought that inspired Bill Bryson to start a journey around the rooms of his own house, an 1851 Norfolk rectory, to consider how the ordinary things in life c ...

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Mrs Robinson's Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady (by Kate Summerscale)

Bloomsbury Paperbacks (14 Mar, 2013)

When the married Isabella Robinson was introduced to the dashing Edward Lane at a party in 1850, she was utterly enchanted. He was ‘fascinating’, she told her diary, before chastising herself for being so susceptible to a man’s charms. But a wish had taken hold of her, and she was to find it hard to shake... In one of the most notorious divorce cases of the nineteenth century, Isabella Robinson ...

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Forgotten Fatherland: The search for Elisabeth Nietzsche (by Ben Macintyre)

Bloomsbury Paperbacks (14 Mar, 2013)

In 1886 Elisabeth Nietzsche, Friedrich's bigoted, imperious sister, founded a 'racially pure' colony in Paraguay together with a band of blond-haired fellow Germans. Over a century later, Ben Macintyre sought out the survivors of Nueva Germania to discover the remains of this bizarre colony. Forgotten Fatherland vividly recounts his arduous adventure locating the survivors, while also tracing the colorful h ...

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