Books

Page 1 of 8, showing 12 records out of 91 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

1888 London Murders in the Year of the Ripper (by Peter Stubley)

The History Press Ltd (01 Sep, 2012)

In 1888 Jack the Ripper made the headlines with a series of horrific murders that remain unsolved to this day. But most killers are not shadowy figures stalking the streets with a lust for blood. Many are ordinary citizens driven to the ultimate crime by circumstance, a fit of anger or a desire for revenge. Their crimes, overshadowed by the few, sensational cases, are ignored, forgotten or written off. This ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Gentleman in Moscow (by Amor Towles)

Hutchinson (09 Feb, 2017)

On 21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov – recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt – is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik ...

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A Very British Murder (by Lucy Worsley)

BBC Digital (12 Sep, 2013)

This is the story of a national obsession. Ever since the Ratcliffe Highway Murders caused a nation-wide panic in Regency England, the British have taken an almost ghoulish pleasure in 'a good murder'. This fascination helped create a whole new world of entertainment, inspiring novels, plays and films, puppet shows, paintings and true-crime journalism - as well as an army of fictional detectives who ...

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Agent Zigzag: The True Wartime Story of Eddie Chapman: Lover, Traitor, Hero, Spy (reissued) (by Ben Macintyre)

Bloomsbury Publishing (17 Aug, 2009)

One December night in 1942, a Nazi parachutist landed in a Cambridgeshire field. His mission: to sabotage the British war effort. His name was Eddie Chapman, but he would shortly become MI5's Agent Zigzag. Dashing and louche, courageous and unpredictable, the traitor was a patriot inside, and the villain a hero. The problem for Chapman, his many lovers and his spymasters was knowing who he was. Ben Macintyr ...

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Alexandra: The Last Tsarina: A Life of the Last Tsarina (by Carolly Erickson)

Robinson Publishing (24 Jul, 2003)

Featuring Tsarina Alexandra's story, this title reveals the dimensions of the Empress' singular psychology: her childhood bereavement, her struggle to attain her romantic goal of marriage to her handsome cousin Nicholas, anguishing shyness, the struggles with her in-laws, a false pregnancy, and her growing dependence on a series of occult mentors.

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At Home: A short history of private life (by Bill Bryson)

Doubleday (27 May, 2010)

The brand new Bryson for 2010. Will do for social history what A Short History of Nearly Everything did for science.

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This book has not yet been reviewed.

 
 

At Home: A short history of private life (by Bill Bryson)

Black Swan (26 May, 2011)

What does history really consists of? Centuries of people quietly going about their daily business - sleeping, eating, having sex, endeavouring to get comfortable. And where did all these normal activities take place? At home. This was the thought that inspired Bill Bryson to start a journey around the rooms of his own house, an 1851 Norfolk rectory, to consider how the ordinary things in life c ...

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Blood and Guts: A Short History of Medicine (by Roy Porter)

Penguin (26 Jun, 2003)

Mankind's battle to stay alive is the greatest of all subjects. This brief, witty and unusual book by Britain's greatest medical historian compresses into a tiny span a lifetime spent thinking about millennia of human ingenuity in the quest to cheat death. Each chapter sums up one of these battlefields (surgery, doctors, disease, hospitals, laboratories and the human body) in a way that is both frightening ...

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Blood and Roses. The Paston Family in the Fifteenth Century. (by Helen Castor)

Faber and Faber (16 Sep, 2004)

The Wars of the Roses turned England upside down. Between 1455 and 1485 four kings lost their thrones, more than forty noblemen lost their lives on the battlefield or their heads on the block, and thousands of the men who followed them met violent deaths. Yet almost nothing is known about the thoughts and feelings of the people who lived through this bloody conflict, whether king or noble, landowner or peas ...

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Blood River: A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart (by Tim Butcher)

Vintage Digital (15 Dec, 2010)

When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to cover Africa in 2000 he quickly became obsessed with the idea of recreating H.M. Stanley's famous expedition - but travelling alone. Despite warnings that his plan was 'suicidal', Butcher set out for the Congo's eastern border with just a rucksack and a few thousand dollars hidden in his boots. Making his way in an assortment of vessels inc ...

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Blood Sisters: The Hidden Lives of the Women Behind the Wars of the Roses (by Sarah Gristwood)

HarperPress (13 Sep, 2012)

The true story of the White Queen and more, this is a thrilling history of the extraordinary noblewomen who lived through the Wars of the Roses. The events of the Wars of the Roses are usually described in terms of the men involved: Richard Duke of York, Henry VI, Edward IV, Richard III and Henry VII. But these years were also packed with women’s drama and – in the tales of conflicted maternity a ...

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Can Any Mother Help Me? (by Jenna Bailey)

Faber and Faber (31 Jan, 2008)

In 1935, a young woman wrote a letter to Nursery World magazine, expressing her feelings of isolation and loneliness. Women from all over the country experiencing similar frustrations wrote back. To create an outlet for their abundant ideas and opinions they started a private magazine, The Cooperative Correspondence Club. The deep friendships formed through its pages ensured the magazine continued until 199 ...

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