Books

Page 1 of 8, showing 12 records out of 91 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

London Under London: A Subterranean Guide (by Richard Trench, Ellis Hillman)

John Murray Publishers Ltd (23 Sep, 1993)

A fascinating description of what was & is under modern day London from wire and tunnels to burials and archeological finds.

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Necropolis: London and Its Dead (by Catharine Arnold)

Pocket Books (05 Mar, 2007)

Offering an historical narrative of London's attitude to going the way of all flesh, this book blends archaeology, architecture and anecdotes in order to document the rise of the undertaking trade, covering everything from the pageantry of state funerals to public executions and bodysnatching.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

Savage Girls and Wild Boys: A History of Feral Children (by Michael Newton)

Faber and Faber (17 Feb, 2003)

In Savage Girls and Wild Boys, Newton tackles the perennially compelling topic of children raised by animals. He examines the lives of these children, of the adults who rescued them and asks what they can teach us about notions of civilisation.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Killing Dragons: The Conquest of the Alps (by Fergus Fleming)

Granta Books (22 Aug, 2001)

The fascinating history of the conquest of the Alps.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

White Mischief (by James Fox)

Vintage (05 Feb, 1998)

Just before 3am on January 24th, 1941, when Britain was preoccupied with surviving the Blitz, the body of Josslyn Hay, Earl of Erroll, was discovered lying on the floor of his Buick, at a road intersection some miles outside Nairobi, with a bullet in his head. A leading figure in Kenya's colonial community, he had recently been appointed Military Secretary, but he was primarily a seducer of other men's wive ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Gunpowder Plot: Terror and Faith in 1605 (by Antonia Fraser)

Phoenix (01 Nov, 2002)

The Gunpowder Plot was 17th century terrorism with the Catholics as a repressed religious minority. This is a well-researched full telling of the unhappy conspiracy and its historical and social context.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Four Queens: The Provencal Sisters Who Ruled Europe (by Nancy Goldstone)

Phoenix (01 Jun, 2009)

The four beautiful, cultured and clever daughters of the Count and Countess of Provence made illustrious marriages and lived at the epicentre of political power and intrigue in 13th-century Europe.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self (by Claire Tomalin)

Penguin (03 Jul, 2003)

Pepys wrote his diary throughout the 1660s and this book vividly brings to life the tumultuous world of 17-century London. Pepys' life spanned the execution of one king and the restoration of another, and Tomalin elegantly recreates both Pepys' public and private lives from his early days in London and then Cambridge through his rise in the bureaucracy of the restored king, Charles II, to his position as e ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Strange Histories: The Trial of the Pig, the Walking Dead and Other Matters of Fact from the Medieva (by Darren Oldridge)

Routledge (17 Nov, 2006)

Strange Histories presents a serious account of some of the most extraordinary occurrences of European and North American history and explains how they made sense to people living at the time. From grisly anecdotes about ghosts, to stories of witches and werevolves, the book uses case studies from the Middle Ages and the early modern period and provides fascinating insights into the world-view of a vani ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Bookseller of Kabul (by ├ůsne Seierstad)

Virago Press Ltd (04 Mar, 2004)

In the spring of 2002, journalist ├ůsne Seierstad went to Afghanistan to live with a family for several months. Here she reveals her experiences, telling the story of Sultan Khan - who defied the authorities for 20 years to supply books to the people of Kabul - and his family.

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This book has not yet been reviewed.

 
 

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher (by Kate Summerscale)

Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (26 Jul, 2008)

In the village of Road in Wiltshire during the summer of 1860, a family awakes to discover that a gruesome murder has taken place in their home. The guilty party is surely still among them. Jack Wilcher of Scotland Yard, the most celebrated detective of his day, has the unenviable task of conducting the investigation.

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4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

At Home: A short history of private life (by Bill Bryson)

Doubleday (27 May, 2010)

The brand new Bryson for 2010. Will do for social history what A Short History of Nearly Everything did for science.

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