Books

Page 1 of 20, showing 12 records out of 237 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

1888 London Murders in the Year of the Ripper (by Peter Stubley)

The History Press Ltd (01 Sep, 2012)

In 1888 Jack the Ripper made the headlines with a series of horrific murders that remain unsolved to this day. But most killers are not shadowy figures stalking the streets with a lust for blood. Many are ordinary citizens driven to the ultimate crime by circumstance, a fit of anger or a desire for revenge. Their crimes, overshadowed by the few, sensational cases, are ignored, forgotten or written off. This ...

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A Brief History Of Time: From Big Bang To Black Holes (by Stephen Hawking)

Bantam (06 Apr, 1995)

Always in the clearest, most accessible terms Stephen Hawkin reviews the great theories of the cosmos from Galileo and Newton to Einstein and Poincare, and then moves on into deepest space for the greatest intellectual adventure of all. Could time run backwards? Will a “no boundary” universe replace the big bang theory? What happens in a universe with eleven dimensions? These are just some of the questi ...

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A Carpet Ride to Khiva: Seven Years on the Silk Road (by Christopher Aslan Alexander)

Icon Books Ltd (01 Jul, 2010)

This is a unique, beautiful and moving account of seven years living in the remote Uzbek desert. "The Silk Road" conjures images of the exotic and the unknown. Most travellers simply pass along it. Brit Chris Alexander chose to live there. Ostensibly writing a guidebook, Alexander found life at the heart of the glittering madrassahs, mosques and minarets of the walled city of Khiva - a remote desert oasis i ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Field Guide to Happiness: What I Learned in Bhutan about Living, Loving, and Waking Up (by Linda Leaming)

Hay House (01 Oct, 2014)

In the West, we have everything we could possibly need or want—except for peace of mind. So writes Linda Leaming, a harried American who traveled from Nashville, Tennessee, to the rugged Himalayan nation of Bhutan—sometimes called the happiest place on Earth—to teach English and unlearn her politicized and polarized, energetic and impatient way of life. In Bhutan if I have three things to do in ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Gentleman in Moscow (by Amor Towles)

Hutchinson (09 Feb, 2017)

On 21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov – recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt – is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik ...

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A Magick Life: The Life of Aleister Crowley (by Martin Booth)

Coronet (06 Dec, 2001)

Crowley advocated the practice of magick and encouraged his followers to create their own life styles and develop a keen self knowledge. He wrote many books on his subject and is still revered as the master of the dark arts with books and websites and followers all over the world. Martin Booth has used his skills as a biographer to encapsulate the man and his extraordinary life-style in a chilling tale of m ...

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A Very British Murder (by Lucy Worsley)

BBC Digital (12 Sep, 2013)

This is the story of a national obsession. Ever since the Ratcliffe Highway Murders caused a nation-wide panic in Regency England, the British have taken an almost ghoulish pleasure in 'a good murder'. This fascination helped create a whole new world of entertainment, inspiring novels, plays and films, puppet shows, paintings and true-crime journalism - as well as an army of fictional detectives who ...

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Agent Zigzag: The True Wartime Story of Eddie Chapman: Lover, Traitor, Hero, Spy (reissued) (by Ben Macintyre)

Bloomsbury Publishing (17 Aug, 2009)

One December night in 1942, a Nazi parachutist landed in a Cambridgeshire field. His mission: to sabotage the British war effort. His name was Eddie Chapman, but he would shortly become MI5's Agent Zigzag. Dashing and louche, courageous and unpredictable, the traitor was a patriot inside, and the villain a hero. The problem for Chapman, his many lovers and his spymasters was knowing who he was. Ben Macintyr ...

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Alexandra: The Last Tsarina: A Life of the Last Tsarina (by Carolly Erickson)

Robinson Publishing (24 Jul, 2003)

Featuring Tsarina Alexandra's story, this title reveals the dimensions of the Empress' singular psychology: her childhood bereavement, her struggle to attain her romantic goal of marriage to her handsome cousin Nicholas, anguishing shyness, the struggles with her in-laws, a false pregnancy, and her growing dependence on a series of occult mentors.

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Amateurs In Eden: The Story of a Bohemian Marriage: Nancy and Lawrence Durrell (by Joanna Hodgkin)

Virago (09 Feb, 2012)

Growing up in a dysfunctional family, Nancy Durrell, the enigmatic first wife of Lawrence Durrell, future author of the Alexandria Quartet, was an introverted provincial schoolgirl who transformed overnight into a young woman of haunting beauty. From the smoky pubs of 1930s Fitzrovia to the sexual mayhem of the Villa Seurat in Paris, her story shines new light on an extraordinary group of people. In a remot ...

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An Englishman in Colombia (by David Wood)

Matador (28 Sep, 2013)

Murder, cocaine, street mugging, bombs and aggressive Amazonian Indians combined with exotic beach resorts and colourful characters make David Wood's book on Colombia an interesting and adventurous look at the most dangerous and alluring country in Latin America. David portrays the capital Bogota as a mixture of colourful street people merging with a vibrant culture. The author's travels in Colombia bring h ...

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Anita and Me (by Meera Syal)

Flamingo (07 Apr, 1997)

It’s 1972. Meena is nine years old and lives in the village of Tollington, ‘the jewel of the Black Country’. She is the daughter of Indian parents who have come to England to give her a better life. As one of the few Punjabi inhabitants of her village, her daily struggle for independence is different from most. She wants fishfingers and chips, not chapati and dhal; she wants an English Christmas, not ...

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