Books

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The Final Curtsey (by Margaret Rhodes)

Umbria Press (30 Nov, -0001)

This is the intimate and revealing autobiography of Margaret Rhodes, the first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II and the niece of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother. Margaret was born into the Scottish aristocracy, into a now almost vanished world of privilege. Royalty often came to stay and her house was run in the style of Downton Abbey. In the Second World War years she 'lodged' at Buckingham Palace while she ...

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2.0 Stars2.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The House That Nino Built (by Don Camillo)

Victor Gollancz (30 Nov, -0001)

Collected vignettes featuring a stylized version of the Don Camillo author's family and painting a humorous picture of middle-class life in post-War Italy. The stories, translated by Frances Frenaye, originally appeared in Italian periodicals.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings (by Dr Maya Angelou)

Virago (26 Jan, 1984)

Maya Angelou's seven volumes of autobiography are a testament to the talents and resilience of this extraordinary writer. Loving the world, she also knows its cruelty. As a Black woman she has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope, joy, achievement and celebration. In this first volume of her six books of autobiography, Maya Angelou beautifully evokes her childhood with her grandmother in ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Q's Legacy (by Helene Hanff)

Sphere (07 Aug, 1986)

This is the remarkable story of how Helene Hanff came to write 84, Charing Cross Road, and of all the things its success has brought her. Hanff recalls her serendipitous discovery of a volume of lectures by a Cambridge don, Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch. She devoured Q’s book, and, wanting to read all the books he recommended, began to order them from a small store in London, at 84, Charing Cross Road. Thus be ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

An Evil Cradling (by Brian Keenan)

Vintage (15 Apr, 1993)

Brian Keenan went to Beirut in 1985 for a change of scene from his native Belfast. He became headline news when he was kidnapped by fundamentalist Shi'ite militiamen and held in the suburbs of Beirut for the next four and a half years. For much of that time he was shut off from all news and contact with anyone other than his jailers and, later, his fellow hostages, amongst them John McCarthy.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

84 Charing Cross Road (by H. Hanff)

Time Warner Paperbacks (24 Jun, 1993)

This book is the very simple story of the love affair between Miss Helene Hanff of New York and Messrs Marks & Co, sellers of rare and secondhand books, at 84 Charing Cross Road, London.

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

The Harem within (by Fatima Mernissi)

Bantam Books (07 Sep, 1995)

As a little girl, Fatima Mernissi was often puzzled by the idea of the harem. Even if you accepted that men and women needed to be kept apart, she asked, why couldn't it be the woman who walked freely in the streets, while men stayed locked behind the harem gates? In this story, she tells of her childhood in a Fez harem in the 1940s, a period of social transition in Morocco. Yasmina, Fatima's grandmother, w ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Whatever Happened to Margo? (by Margaret Durrell)

Time Warner Paperbacks (01 Aug, 1996)

In 1947, with two young children to support, Margaret Durrell took the advice of her maiden aunt and started a boarding house in Bournemouth. But any hopes of a conventional clientele were dashed as the establishment was colonized by a host of eccentrics, comprising, among others, a painter of nudes, a battered wife, a chauvinist bricklayer, and a Maltese transsexual. With brother Gerald descending from tim ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Diving-Bell and the Butterfly (by Jean-Dominique Bauby)

Fourth Estate (10 Apr, 1997)

On December 8, 1995, Jean-Dominique Bauby's life was forever altered when a part of his body he'd never heard of--his brain stem--was rendered inactive. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, his exquisitely painful memoir, is neither a triumphant account of recovery nor a journey into the abyss of self-pity. Instead, it is a tender testament to the power of language and love. At 43, Bauby was defined by succ ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Child of Happy Valley: The Childhood Memoir of Juanita Carberry (by Nicola Tyrer, Juanita Carberry)

Arrow Books Ltd (06 Jul, 2000)

This colourful and passionate memoir reveals the darkness behind the glittering White Mischief society. Carberry divulges her miserable motherless childhood, the experience of living with her fascist father and her involvement in the Lord Erroll affair.

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Colours Of The Mountain (by Da Chen)

Arrow (03 Aug, 2000)

A book about friendships, prejudice, familial love and academic striving, and of one man's escape from hunger, poverty and ignorance, Colours of the Mountain is an inspiring and eloquently recounted memoir of growing up a pariah in rural China.

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Hidden Lives: A Family Memoir (by Margaret Forster)

Penguin (26 Apr, 2001)

Margaret Forster's grandmother died in 1936, taking many secrets to her grave. Where had she spent the first 23 years of her life? Who was the woman in black who paid her a mysterious visit shortly before her death? How had she borne living so close to an illegitimate daughter without acknowledging her? The search for answers took Margaret on a journey into her family’s past, examining not only her ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 
 
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