Books

Page 1 of 13, showing 12 records out of 145 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (by Rebecca Skloot)

Pan (01 Jan, 2011)

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. Born a poor black tobacco farmer, her cancer cells – taken without her knowledge – became a multimillion-dollar industry and one of the most important tools in medicine. Yet Henrietta's family did not learn of her 'immortality' until more than twenty years after her death, with devastating consequences . . . Rebecca Skloot's fascinating a ...

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Two Lives (by Vikram Seth)

Abacus (06 Jul, 2006)

TWO LIVES tells the remarkable story of Seth's great uncle and aunt. His great uncle Shanti left India for medical school in Berlin in the 1930s and lodged with a German Jewish family. In the household was a daughter, Henny, who urged her mother 'not to take the blackie'. But a friendship developed and each managed to leave Germany and found their way to Britain as the Nazis rose to power. Shanti joined the ...

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A Small Person Far Away (by Judith Kerr)

HarperCollinsChildren'sBooks (09 Sep, 2011)

Berlin is where Anna lived before Hitler, when she was still a German child; before she spoke a word of English, before her family had all become refugees. Long before her happy new existence in London. But Mama is there, dangerously ill. Anna is forced to go back, to deal with questions of life and death, to face old fears, and to discover the past which she has so long shut away.

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I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings (by Dr Maya Angelou)

Virago (26 Jan, 1984)

Maya Angelou's seven volumes of autobiography are a testament to the talents and resilience of this extraordinary writer. Loving the world, she also knows its cruelty. As a Black woman she has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope, joy, achievement and celebration. In this first volume of her six books of autobiography, Maya Angelou beautifully evokes her childhood with her grandmother in ...

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The Silent Twins (by Marjorie Wallace)

Vintage (18 Apr, 1996)

When identical twins, June and Jennifer Gibbons were three they began to reject communication with anyone but each other, and so began a childhood bound together in a strange and secret world. As they grew up, love, hate and genius united to push them to the extreme margins of society and, following a five week spree of vandalism and arson, the silent twins were sentenced to a gruelling twelve-year detentio ...

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Shelley and His World (by Claire Tomalin)

Encore Editions (30 Nov, -0001)

"Shelley and His World" was universally acclaimed on publication as an ideal introduction to the poet's life and work. This much-requested reissue is guaranteed to delight Claire Tomalin's loyal readership. 'A vivid, amusing yet heartbreaking picture of Shelley emerges: poetry, politics, travel, friendships, love-affairs, scandals, mysteries, children, visions - all gracefully combined' - "London Review of ...

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My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Family's Nazi Past (by Jennifer Teege, Nikola Sellmair)

Hodder & Stoughton (24 Sep, 2015)

When Jennifer Teege, a German-Nigerian woman, happened to pluck a library book from the shelf, she had no idea that her life would be irrevocably altered. Recognising photos of her mother and grandmother in the book, she discovers a horrifying fact: Her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the vicious Nazi commandant chillingly depicted by Ralph Fiennes in Schindler's List - a man known and reviled the world over. ...

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The House That Nino Built (by Don Camillo)

Victor Gollancz (30 Nov, -0001)

Collected vignettes featuring a stylized version of the Don Camillo author's family and painting a humorous picture of middle-class life in post-War Italy. The stories, translated by Frances Frenaye, originally appeared in Italian periodicals.

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A Field Full of Butterflies: Memories of a Romany Childhood (by Rosemary Penfold)

Orion (14 Apr, 2011)

Rosemary Penfold was born in 1938 in a traditional Gypsy wagon, and grew up in the fields of the English countryside. In this beautiful and evocative memoir, she recounts her life within a loving extended family and small but close-knit community. From early memories of her father bringing home oranges during the war, to the simple beauty of a field full of butterflies on a hot summer's day, Rosemary's stun ...

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The Housekeeper's Tale: The Women Who Really Ran the English Country House (by Tessa Boase)

Aurum Press Ltd (12 Mar, 2015)

Working as a housekeeper was one of the most prestigious jobs a nineteenth and early twentieth century woman could want – and also one of the toughest. A far cry from the Downton Abbey fiction, the real life Mrs Hughes was up against capricious mistresses, low pay, no job security and gruelling physical labour. Until now, her story has never been told. The Housekeeper’s Tale reveals the personal sacrifi ...

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Broken and Betrayed: The true story of the Rotherham abuse scandal by the woman who fought to expose (by Jayne Senior)

Pan (24 Mar, 2016)

For fourteen years, Jayne Senior tried to help girls from Rotherham who had been groomed, raped, tortured, pimped and threatened with violence by sex traffickers. As the manager of Risky Business, which was set up to work with vulnerable teens, she heard heartbreaking and shocking stories of abuse and assiduously kept notes and details of the perpetrators, passing information on to the authorities in the be ...

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The Invisible Wall (by Harry Bernstein)

Arrow (01 Nov, 2007)

The Invisible Wall Harry Bernsteins' childhood in the industrial north of England in the shadow of the First World War is one of hardship and hostility. His brutish father spends what little he earns at the tailoring shop on drink, while his devoted mother survives on her dreams. This is a story of working class life and the daily struggle to make ends meet.

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