Books

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The Adventure Of English (by Melvyn Bragg)

Sceptre (02 Jun, 2016)

English is the collective work of millions of people throughout the ages. It is democratic, ever-changing and ingenious in its assimilation of other cultures. English runs through the heart of world finance, medicine and the Internet, and it is understood by around two thousand million people across the world. Yet it was very nearly wiped out in its early years. In this book Melvyn Bragg shows us the rem ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language (by Mark Forsyth)

Icon Books Ltd (06 Sep, 2012)

What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled? What links church organs to organised crime, California to the Caliphate, or brackets to codpieces? The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth's Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words. It's an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Just My Type: A Book About Fonts (by Simon Garfield)

Profile Books (22 Sep, 2011)

Just My Type is not just a font book, but a book of stories. About how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. About why Barack Obama opted for Gotham, while Amy Winehouse found her soul in 30s Art Deco. About the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, or people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook, or Margaret Calvert, who invented the motorway signs that are used from Watford ...

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The Last Word: Tales from the Tip of the Mother Tongue (by Ben Macintyre)

Bloomsbury Paperbacks (01 Jun, 2011)

Do you know your geek-speak from your geek-chic? Ever wanted to put Humpty Dumpty together again? Can you distinguish Spanglish from Chinglish? We adapt words from other languages, from slang, from developments in science, literature and art. Learn the advantages of having your own signature word; why the lifts in the House of Commons have posh accents; and discover the discreet art of the loophemism.

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The 100 Most Pointless Things in the World (by Alexander Armstrong, Richard Osman)

Coronet (11 Oct, 2012)

'We gave 100 people 100 seconds to name the greatest show in the history of television. There was only one pointless answer and it was Pointless. And now in book form.'

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Icons of England

Black Swan (01 Apr, 2010)

This celebration of the English countryside does not only focus on the rolling green landscapes and magnificent monuments that set England apart from the rest of the world. Many of the contributors bring their own special touch, presenting a refreshingly eclectic variety of personal icons, from pub signs to seaside piers, from cattle grids to canal boats, and from village cricket to nimbies.

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2.0 Stars2.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Lost for Words: The Mangling and Manipulating of the English Language (by John Humphrys)

Hodder Paperbacks (04 Jul, 2005)

From empty cliche to meaningless jargon, dangling participle to sentences without verbs, the English language is reeling. It is under attack from all sides. Politicians dupe us with deliberately evasive language. Bosses worry about impacting the bottom line while they think out of the box. Academics talk obscure mumbo jumbo. Journalists and broadcasters, who should know better, lazily collaborate. John H ...

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Eats, Shoots and Leaves (by Lynne Truss)

Fourth Estate (01 Oct, 2009)

Everyone knows the basics of punctuation, surely? Aren't we all taught at school how to use full stops, commas and question marks? And yet we see ignorance and indifference everywhere. "Its Summer!" says a sign that cries out for an apostrophe. "ANTIQUE,S," says another, bizarrely. "Pansy's ready", we learn to our considerable interest ("Is she?"), as we browse among the bedding plants. In Eats, Shoots ...

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Do Not Pass Go: From the Old Kent Road to Mayfair (by Tim Moore)

Vintage (02 Oct, 2003)

Monopoly was, at least officially, invented during the 1930s by Charles Darrow, an unemployed boiler salesman from Germantown, Pennsylvania. (Darrow went to his grave, Moore notes, "stubbornly refusing to recall any contact with The Landlord Game, patented in 1904."). The original, and subsequent American versions, featured the streets of Atlantic City. The English, London edition first appeared in 1936, th ...

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Sharon Welch's Cross-stitch Cards: Over 80 Easy-to-make Designs (by Sharon Welch)

Hamlyn (28 Jul, 1994)

While commercially produced cards are often discarded, the joy of sending hand-made designs is that they carry a personal message which is often treasured for years to come. Sharon Welch's Cross Stitched Cards satisfies the growing demand for attractive cards by showing the reader how to produce a vast range of exclusive designs covering every season and occasion. All the cards are simple to make and can be ...

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