Books

Page 1 of 8, showing 12 records out of 85 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

Blood and Roses. The Paston Family in the Fifteenth Century. (by Helen Castor)

Faber and Faber (16 Sep, 2004)

The Wars of the Roses turned England upside down. Between 1455 and 1485 four kings lost their thrones, more than forty noblemen lost their lives on the battlefield or their heads on the block, and thousands of the men who followed them met violent deaths. Yet almost nothing is known about the thoughts and feelings of the people who lived through this bloody conflict, whether king or noble, landowner or peas ...

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The King is Dead (by Suzannah Lipscomb)

Head of Zeus (05 Nov, 2015)

On 28 January 1547, the sickly and obese King Henry VIII died at Whitehall. Just hours before his passing, his last will and testament had been read, stamped and sealed. The will confirmed the line of succession as Edward, Mary and Elizabeth; and, following them, the Grey and Suffolk families. It also listed bequests to the king's most trusted councillors and servants. Henry's will is one of the most intrig ...

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Seeking Robinson Crusoe (by Tim Severin)

Pan (06 Jun, 2003)

Combining travel to remote islands and shores with brilliant literary detective work, Seeking Robinson Crusoe is a tale of adventure and discovery and is a fantastic journey into myth and history.

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Family Secrets: Shame and Privacy in Modern Britain (by M D Deborah Cohen)

Oxford University Press, USA (24 Apr, 2013)

We live today in a culture of full disclosure, where tell-all memoirs top the best-seller lists, transparency is lauded, and privacy seems imperiled. But how did we get here? Exploring scores of previously sealed records, Family Secrets offers a sweeping account of how shame--and the relationship between secrecy and openness--has changed over the last two centuries in Britain. Deborah Cohen uses detailed sk ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Underground London: Travels Beneath the City Streets (by Stephen Smith)

Little, Brown (11 Mar, 2004)

What is visible to the naked eye has been exhaustively raked over; In UNDERGROUND LONDON, acclaimed travel writer Stephen Smith provides an alternative guide and history of the capital. It's a journey through the passages and tunnels of the city, the bunkers and tunnels, crypts and shadows. As well as being a contemporary tour of underground London, it's also an exploration through time: Queen Boudicca lies ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Gentleman in Moscow (by Amor Towles)

Hutchinson (09 Feb, 2017)

On 21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov – recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt – is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Dick Turpin: The Myth of the English Highwayman (by James Sharpe)

Profile Books (27 Jan, 2005)

Almost everything people know about Dick Turpin and highwaymen is myth. The historical truth is much nastier, more brutal and bloody. As Dick Turpin went to the scaffold in York in 1739 he was determined to look his best. The previous day he had had a new frock coat and pumps delivered to him in the condemned man's cell in York Castle Prison. And he paid £3 and 10 shillings for five men to act as mourners. ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Katherine Howard: The Tragic Story of Henry VIII's Fifth Queen (by Josephine Wilkinson)

John Murray (07 Apr, 2016)

Looming out of the encroaching darkness of the February evening was London Bridge, still ornamented with the severed heads of Thomas Culpeper and Francis Dereham; the terrible price they had paid for suspected intimacy with the queen. Katherine now reached the Tower of London, her final destination. Katherine Howard was the fifth wife of Henry VIII and cousin to the executed Anne Boleyn. She first cam ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Witches: James I and the English Witch Hunts (by Tracy Borman)

Vintage (02 Oct, 2014)

In Belvoir Castle, the heir of one of England’s great noble families falls suddenly and dangerously ill. His body is ‘tormented’ with violent convulsions. Within a few short weeks he will suffer an excruciating death. Soon the whole family will be stricken with the same terrifying symptoms. The second son, the last male of the line, will not survive. It is said witches are to blame. And so the Earl ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Magna Carta: The Making and Legacy of the Great Charter (by Dan Jones)

Head of Zeus (04 Dec, 2014)

On a summer's day in 1215 a beleaguered English monarch met a group of disgruntled barons in a meadow by the river Thames named Runnymede. Beset by foreign crisis and domestic rebellion, King John was fast running out of options. On 15 June he reluctantly agreed to fix his regal seal to a document that would change the world. A milestone in the development of constitutional politics and the rule of law, ...

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If Walls Could Talk: An intimate history of the home (by Lucy Worsley)

Faber & Faber (05 Jan, 2012)

If Walls Could Talk Why did the flushing toilet take two centuries to catch on? Why did Samuel Pepys never give his mistresses an orgasm? Why did medieval people sleep sitting up? When were the two 'dirty centuries'? Why did gas lighting cause Victorian ladies to faint? Why, for centuries, did people fear fruit? This title answers these questions. Full description

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The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse: An Extraordinary Edwardian Case of Deception (by Piu Marie Eatwell)

Head of Zeus (07 May, 2015)

The extraordinary story of the Druce-Portland affair, one of the most notorious, tangled and bizarre legal cases of the late Victorian and Edwardian eras. In 1897 an elderly widow, Anna Maria Druce, made a strange request of the London Ecclesiastical Court: it was for the exhumation of the grave of her late father-in-law, T.C. Druce. Behind her application lay a sensational claim: that Druce had been ...

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