Books

Page 1 of 19, showing 12 records out of 228 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

Blood and Roses. The Paston Family in the Fifteenth Century. (by Helen Castor)

Faber and Faber (16 Sep, 2004)

The Wars of the Roses turned England upside down. Between 1455 and 1485 four kings lost their thrones, more than forty noblemen lost their lives on the battlefield or their heads on the block, and thousands of the men who followed them met violent deaths. Yet almost nothing is known about the thoughts and feelings of the people who lived through this bloody conflict, whether king or noble, landowner or peas ...

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The King is Dead (by Suzannah Lipscomb)

Head of Zeus (05 Nov, 2015)

On 28 January 1547, the sickly and obese King Henry VIII died at Whitehall. Just hours before his passing, his last will and testament had been read, stamped and sealed. The will confirmed the line of succession as Edward, Mary and Elizabeth; and, following them, the Grey and Suffolk families. It also listed bequests to the king's most trusted councillors and servants. Henry's will is one of the most intrig ...

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Seeking Robinson Crusoe (by Tim Severin)

Pan (06 Jun, 2003)

Combining travel to remote islands and shores with brilliant literary detective work, Seeking Robinson Crusoe is a tale of adventure and discovery and is a fantastic journey into myth and history.

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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (by Rebecca Skloot)

Pan (01 Jan, 2011)

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. Born a poor black tobacco farmer, her cancer cells – taken without her knowledge – became a multimillion-dollar industry and one of the most important tools in medicine. Yet Henrietta's family did not learn of her 'immortality' until more than twenty years after her death, with devastating consequences . . . Rebecca Skloot's fascinating a ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Two Lives (by Vikram Seth)

Abacus (06 Jul, 2006)

TWO LIVES tells the remarkable story of Seth's great uncle and aunt. His great uncle Shanti left India for medical school in Berlin in the 1930s and lodged with a German Jewish family. In the household was a daughter, Henny, who urged her mother 'not to take the blackie'. But a friendship developed and each managed to leave Germany and found their way to Britain as the Nazis rose to power. Shanti joined the ...

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5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Family Secrets: Shame and Privacy in Modern Britain (by M D Deborah Cohen)

Oxford University Press, USA (24 Apr, 2013)

We live today in a culture of full disclosure, where tell-all memoirs top the best-seller lists, transparency is lauded, and privacy seems imperiled. But how did we get here? Exploring scores of previously sealed records, Family Secrets offers a sweeping account of how shame--and the relationship between secrecy and openness--has changed over the last two centuries in Britain. Deborah Cohen uses detailed sk ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Silent Twins (by Marjorie Wallace)

Vintage (18 Apr, 1996)

When identical twins, June and Jennifer Gibbons were three they began to reject communication with anyone but each other, and so began a childhood bound together in a strange and secret world. As they grew up, love, hate and genius united to push them to the extreme margins of society and, following a five week spree of vandalism and arson, the silent twins were sentenced to a gruelling twelve-year detentio ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Underground London: Travels Beneath the City Streets (by Stephen Smith)

Little, Brown (11 Mar, 2004)

What is visible to the naked eye has been exhaustively raked over; In UNDERGROUND LONDON, acclaimed travel writer Stephen Smith provides an alternative guide and history of the capital. It's a journey through the passages and tunnels of the city, the bunkers and tunnels, crypts and shadows. As well as being a contemporary tour of underground London, it's also an exploration through time: Queen Boudicca lies ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Gentleman in Moscow (by Amor Towles)

Hutchinson (09 Feb, 2017)

On 21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov – recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt – is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Shelley and His World (by Claire Tomalin)

Encore Editions (30 Nov, -0001)

"Shelley and His World" was universally acclaimed on publication as an ideal introduction to the poet's life and work. This much-requested reissue is guaranteed to delight Claire Tomalin's loyal readership. 'A vivid, amusing yet heartbreaking picture of Shelley emerges: poetry, politics, travel, friendships, love-affairs, scandals, mysteries, children, visions - all gracefully combined' - "London Review of ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Housekeeper's Tale: The Women Who Really Ran the English Country House (by Tessa Boase)

Aurum Press Ltd (12 Mar, 2015)

Working as a housekeeper was one of the most prestigious jobs a nineteenth and early twentieth century woman could want – and also one of the toughest. A far cry from the Downton Abbey fiction, the real life Mrs Hughes was up against capricious mistresses, low pay, no job security and gruelling physical labour. Until now, her story has never been told. The Housekeeper’s Tale reveals the personal sacrifi ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Adventure Of English (by Melvyn Bragg)

Sceptre (02 Jun, 2016)

English is the collective work of millions of people throughout the ages. It is democratic, ever-changing and ingenious in its assimilation of other cultures. English runs through the heart of world finance, medicine and the Internet, and it is understood by around two thousand million people across the world. Yet it was very nearly wiped out in its early years. In this book Melvyn Bragg shows us the rem ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
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