Books

Page 1 of 19, showing 12 records out of 221 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

The Silent Twins (by Marjorie Wallace)

Vintage (18 Apr, 1996)

When identical twins, June and Jennifer Gibbons were three they began to reject communication with anyone but each other, and so began a childhood bound together in a strange and secret world. As they grew up, love, hate and genius united to push them to the extreme margins of society and, following a five week spree of vandalism and arson, the silent twins were sentenced to a gruelling twelve-year detentio ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Underground London: Travels Beneath the City Streets (by Stephen Smith)

Little, Brown (11 Mar, 2004)

What is visible to the naked eye has been exhaustively raked over; In UNDERGROUND LONDON, acclaimed travel writer Stephen Smith provides an alternative guide and history of the capital. It's a journey through the passages and tunnels of the city, the bunkers and tunnels, crypts and shadows. As well as being a contemporary tour of underground London, it's also an exploration through time: Queen Boudicca lies ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Gentleman in Moscow (by Amor Towles)

Hutchinson (09 Feb, 2017)

On 21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov – recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt – is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Shelley and His World (by Claire Tomalin)

Encore Editions (30 Nov, -0001)

"Shelley and His World" was universally acclaimed on publication as an ideal introduction to the poet's life and work. This much-requested reissue is guaranteed to delight Claire Tomalin's loyal readership. 'A vivid, amusing yet heartbreaking picture of Shelley emerges: poetry, politics, travel, friendships, love-affairs, scandals, mysteries, children, visions - all gracefully combined' - "London Review of ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Housekeeper's Tale: The Women Who Really Ran the English Country House (by Tessa Boase)

Aurum Press Ltd (12 Mar, 2015)

Working as a housekeeper was one of the most prestigious jobs a nineteenth and early twentieth century woman could want – and also one of the toughest. A far cry from the Downton Abbey fiction, the real life Mrs Hughes was up against capricious mistresses, low pay, no job security and gruelling physical labour. Until now, her story has never been told. The Housekeeper’s Tale reveals the personal sacrifi ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Adventure Of English (by Melvyn Bragg)

Sceptre (02 Jun, 2016)

English is the collective work of millions of people throughout the ages. It is democratic, ever-changing and ingenious in its assimilation of other cultures. English runs through the heart of world finance, medicine and the Internet, and it is understood by around two thousand million people across the world. Yet it was very nearly wiped out in its early years. In this book Melvyn Bragg shows us the rem ...

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3.0 Stars3.0 Stars3.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Dick Turpin: The Myth of the English Highwayman (by James Sharpe)

Profile Books (27 Jan, 2005)

Almost everything people know about Dick Turpin and highwaymen is myth. The historical truth is much nastier, more brutal and bloody. As Dick Turpin went to the scaffold in York in 1739 he was determined to look his best. The previous day he had had a new frock coat and pumps delivered to him in the condemned man's cell in York Castle Prison. And he paid £3 and 10 shillings for five men to act as mourners. ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Katherine Howard: The Tragic Story of Henry VIII's Fifth Queen (by Josephine Wilkinson)

John Murray (07 Apr, 2016)

Looming out of the encroaching darkness of the February evening was London Bridge, still ornamented with the severed heads of Thomas Culpeper and Francis Dereham; the terrible price they had paid for suspected intimacy with the queen. Katherine now reached the Tower of London, her final destination. Katherine Howard was the fifth wife of Henry VIII and cousin to the executed Anne Boleyn. She first cam ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Witches: James I and the English Witch Hunts (by Tracy Borman)

Vintage (02 Oct, 2014)

In Belvoir Castle, the heir of one of England’s great noble families falls suddenly and dangerously ill. His body is ‘tormented’ with violent convulsions. Within a few short weeks he will suffer an excruciating death. Soon the whole family will be stricken with the same terrifying symptoms. The second son, the last male of the line, will not survive. It is said witches are to blame. And so the Earl ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer (by Kate Summerscale)

Bloomsbury Publishing (29 Apr, 2016)

Early in the morning of Monday 8 July 1895, thirteen-year-old Robert Coombes and his twelve-year-old brother Nattie set out from their small, yellow-brick terraced house in East London to watch a cricket match at Lord's. Their father had gone to sea the previous Friday, the boys told their neighbours, and their mother was visiting her family in Liverpool. Over the next ten days Robert and Nattie spent extra ...

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4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars4.5 Stars from 2 Reviews

 
 

Thomas Hardy: The Time-torn Man (by Claire Tomalin)

Penguin (21 Jun, 2012)

Paradox ruled Thomas Hardy's life. His birth was almost his death; he became one of the great Victorian novelists and reinvented himself as one of the twentieth-century's greatest poets; he was an unhappy husband and a desolate widower; he wrote bitter attacks on the English class system yet prized the friendship of aristocrats. In the hands of Whitbread Award-winning biographer Claire Tomalin, author of ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Those Wild Wyndhams: Three Sisters at the Heart of Power (by Claudia Renton)

William Collins (20 Nov, 2014)

Mary, Madeline and Pamela – the three beautiful Wyndham sisters – were born into immense wealth. Cultured bohemian daughters of a maverick politician and an artistic mother, they became entangled with the scandalous and intellectual ‘Souls’ set, as well as the most celebrated figures of the day, including Oscar Wilde, Marie Stopes and the iconoclastic poet Wilfrid Scawen Blunt, lover both of Mary an ...

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4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
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