Books

Page 1 of 7, showing 12 records out of 77 total, starting on record 1, ending on 12

A Small Person Far Away (by Judith Kerr)

HarperCollinsChildren'sBooks (09 Sep, 2011)

Berlin is where Anna lived before Hitler, when she was still a German child; before she spoke a word of English, before her family had all become refugees. Long before her happy new existence in London. But Mama is there, dangerously ill. Anna is forced to go back, to deal with questions of life and death, to face old fears, and to discover the past which she has so long shut away.

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings (by Dr Maya Angelou)

Virago (26 Jan, 1984)

Maya Angelou's seven volumes of autobiography are a testament to the talents and resilience of this extraordinary writer. Loving the world, she also knows its cruelty. As a Black woman she has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope, joy, achievement and celebration. In this first volume of her six books of autobiography, Maya Angelou beautifully evokes her childhood with her grandmother in ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Family's Nazi Past (by Jennifer Teege, Nikola Sellmair)

Hodder & Stoughton (24 Sep, 2015)

When Jennifer Teege, a German-Nigerian woman, happened to pluck a library book from the shelf, she had no idea that her life would be irrevocably altered. Recognising photos of her mother and grandmother in the book, she discovers a horrifying fact: Her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the vicious Nazi commandant chillingly depicted by Ralph Fiennes in Schindler's List - a man known and reviled the world over. ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The House That Nino Built (by Don Camillo)

Victor Gollancz (30 Nov, -0001)

Collected vignettes featuring a stylized version of the Don Camillo author's family and painting a humorous picture of middle-class life in post-War Italy. The stories, translated by Frances Frenaye, originally appeared in Italian periodicals.

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A Field Full of Butterflies: Memories of a Romany Childhood (by Rosemary Penfold)

Orion (14 Apr, 2011)

Rosemary Penfold was born in 1938 in a traditional Gypsy wagon, and grew up in the fields of the English countryside. In this beautiful and evocative memoir, she recounts her life within a loving extended family and small but close-knit community. From early memories of her father bringing home oranges during the war, to the simple beauty of a field full of butterflies on a hot summer's day, Rosemary's stun ...

Buy Now See Reviews

2.0 Stars2.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Broken and Betrayed: The true story of the Rotherham abuse scandal by the woman who fought to expose (by Jayne Senior)

Pan (24 Mar, 2016)

For fourteen years, Jayne Senior tried to help girls from Rotherham who had been groomed, raped, tortured, pimped and threatened with violence by sex traffickers. As the manager of Risky Business, which was set up to work with vulnerable teens, she heard heartbreaking and shocking stories of abuse and assiduously kept notes and details of the perpetrators, passing information on to the authorities in the be ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Invisible Wall (by Harry Bernstein)

Arrow (01 Nov, 2007)

The Invisible Wall Harry Bernsteins' childhood in the industrial north of England in the shadow of the First World War is one of hardship and hostility. His brutish father spends what little he earns at the tailoring shop on drink, while his devoted mother survives on her dreams. This is a story of working class life and the daily struggle to make ends meet.

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

A House Full of Daughters (by Juliet Nicolson)

Chatto & Windus (24 Mar, 2016)

As read on BBC Radio 4. All families have their myths and legends. For many years Juliet Nicolson accepted hers - the dangerous beauty of her flamenco dancing great-great-grandmother Pepita, the flirty manipulation of her great-grandmother Victoria, the infamous eccentricity of her grandmother Vita, her mother's Tory-conventional background. But then Juliet, a renowned historian, started to question. As she ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Last Act of Love: The Story of My Brother and His Sister (by Cathy Rentzenbrink)

Picador (05 May, 2016)

In the summer of 1990, Cathy's brother Matty was knocked down by a car on the way home from a night out. It was two weeks before his GCSE results, which turned out to be the best in his school. Sitting by his unconscious body in hospital, holding his hand and watching his heartbeat on the monitors, Cathy and her parents willed him to survive. They did not know then that there are many and various fates wors ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

Q's Legacy (by Helene Hanff)

Sphere (07 Aug, 1986)

This is the remarkable story of how Helene Hanff came to write 84, Charing Cross Road, and of all the things its success has brought her. Hanff recalls her serendipitous discovery of a volume of lectures by a Cambridge don, Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch. She devoured Q’s book, and, wanting to read all the books he recommended, began to order them from a small store in London, at 84, Charing Cross Road. Thus be ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

One Pair of Hands: From Upstairs to Downstairs, in this charming 1930s memoir (by Monica Dickens)

Ebury Press (15 Sep, 2011)

'Life was a wordless battle of wits between us, with her keeping a sharp look-out for signs of neglect, and me trying to disguise my slovenliness by subterfuge. I became an adept at sweeping dust under the bed, and always used the same few pieces of silver' Unimpressed by the world of debutante balls, Monica Dickens shocked her family by getting a job. With no experience whatsoever, she gained employment ...

Buy Now See Reviews

4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars4.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 

The Yorkshire Shepherdess (by Amanda Owen)

Pan (26 Feb, 2015)

Amanda Owen has been seen by millions on ITV's The Dales, living a life that has almost gone in today's modern world, a life ruled by the seasons and her animals. She is a farmer's wife and shepherdess, living alongside her husband Clive and seven children at Ravenseat, a 2000 acre sheep hill farm at the head of Swaledale in North Yorkshire. It's a challenging life but one she loves. In The Yorkshire She ...

Buy Now See Reviews

5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars5.0 Stars from 1 Review

 
 
 
<< previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7